“NOT MY HERITAGE”: Conversations on New Identities / Voices in Conservation hosted by Carleton University

Saturday, April 23 Carleton University will convene conversations on conservation

Last year I attended an engaging symposium on heritage conservation put on by Carleton University Students. Last year’s theme was Unsettling Heritage. This year the conversation will be focused on New Identities / Voices in Conservation and will pose the questions:

  • Whose heritage are we conserving?
  • Whose heritage is being unrepresented or underrepresented in the heritage conservation discourse of the 21st century?

“This theme aims to critically address missing identities and voices in the heritage field and/or highlight alternative stories and perspectives in heritage conservation.”

“In recent years, the identification and conservation of cultural heritage resources—the built environment, cultural landscapes, or intangible heritage—by heritage professionals, has needed to expand and broaden its understanding of community histories to address the plurality and the multi-narratives that exist in our communities. Events such as: the release of the Final Report on Residential Schools by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, the Occupy movement, the protests for gender equality rights, the push for youth engagement in civic duties (voting), and the global issue of refugees and immigration, have recently highlighted some of these ignored or unknown identities and voices that exist, and which have been underrepresented or unrepresented in the field of heritage conservation.” Read more…

Online registration closes tomorrow at noon. Tickets will also be available at the venue door Mill Street Brewery, 555 Wellington Street, Ottawa.

View Full Schedule Here

WHERE: Mill Street Brewery, 555 Wellington Street
WHEN: Saturday, April 23 from 9:00 am to 4 pm
COST: $15 Students / $45 General Admission (Online Registration) $20 Students / $50 General Admission (At the Door)

NATIONAL ABORIGINAL DAY: Is Canada Doing Enough?

A male and female performer in Indigenous dress with city scape behind themImage from Kaha:wi Dance Theatre performing “The Honouring” tonight & tomorrow @ 9:15 pm @ Fort York, Toronto, Performances are Free.

No.

Days of recognition are always problematic. There are celebrations for everything from Water to Women. In an age where a well branded campaign can get an issue talk time does the message get diluted when those commemorative days are reduced down to a quick and digestible moment of  cultural exchange?

When I bring up the Residential School System with non-native friends its shocking how no one seems to have much of an idea of what this is and what took place – is still taking place.

Genocides? Only happen in places with exotic names. Not here.

Slavery? That happened in America.

Apartheid? Nope.

Cultural Amnesia? Never heard of this.

Exactly!

Most Canadians no little about the history of Indigenous Peoples here in Canada and their experience of Indigenous culture is at arm’s length – behind glass in a museum, a film with questionable stereotypes, a Canada Day performance.

So on this National Aboriginal Day here’s a challenge for Canadians – let’s start to get acquainted with not only the history of First Nations, Métis and Inuit people but also the contemporary issues that we as a country are connected to and implicated in.

If experiencing the Arts is your way to expose your mind to new narratives that’s great because we have so many amazing contemporary Aboriginal artists in this country and MIXED BAG MAG will continue to post on all the incredible talent. Best part – there’s probably something to experience the other 364 days of the year!

FRIDAY FOOD FOR THOUGHT

National Aboriginal Day: Friend or foe?
By Sarah Hunt for Media Indigena

“Today, June 21, is Canada’s National Aboriginal Day. This morning, like most other days, I woke up, made my coffee, and sat down to read the news. The consensus seems to be that today is a day to celebrate Aboriginal cultures and to remember our vibrant history within Canada.

In the newspapers, stories of celebration and cultural performance encourage all Canadians to learn about us, to let us share our cultures with them, and to celebrate Aboriginals as part of Canada’s strong foundation of diversity. And, like most other days, I also read stories about the ongoing struggles for Indigenous land rights, protection of Indigenous grave sites, and recognition of high rates of violence. Yet I further notice that coverage of these concurrent realities — the celebration and the struggles — seem to be kept very separate, as though they cannot exist together, or are somehow irreconcilable in the minds of Canadians and the federal government.”  Read more on Media Indigena

MIXED BAG MAG recommends joining this important project “Walking With Our Sisters” on their Facebook Group.

Over 600+ native women in Canada are reported missing or murdered in the last 20 years. Many vanished without a trace with inadequate inquiry into their disappearance or slaying paid by the media, the general public, politicians and even law enforcement. This is a travesty of justice.

Walking With Our Sisters is a commemorative art installation of 600+ moccasin vamps (tops) created and donated by hundreds of caring and concerned individuals to draw attention to this injustice.” Read more on www.walkingwithoursisters.ca

Image of the beaded tops of moccasins

IDLE? KNOW MORE: Nation to Nation Now Upcoming Events

Event poster Nation to Nation Now with a circle of Aboriginal performers with background of the globe behind them

TONIGHT…
CONCERT : Nation to Nation Now
Thursday, March 21, 9 pm
Revival
783 College St. (at Shaw, South East Side)
View Map
PYWC

THIS WEEKEND…
THE CONVERSATIONS: Nation to Nation Now
Saturday, March 23, 10 am – 9 pm
OISE auditorium
University of Toronto Campus
252 Bloor St W (St. George Subway Station)
View Map

Free | Donations accepted

“An event organized by Idle No More Toronto, the Indigenous Sovereignty and Solidarity Network, Muskrat Magazine, and the Justina M. Barnicke Gallery at Hart House, University of Toronto:

NATION TO NATION NOW
Idle? KNOW more!

Featuring conversations with good hearts and minds working for change...Come and learn about Anishinabeg and Haudenausonee Nationhood, Indigenous Women’s Leadership in the movement, Canada’s First Nation Termination Plan, and hear directly from Defenders of the Land and allies on the realities on the ground and strategies for moving forward.”
(cited from Indigenous Sovereignty & Solidarity Network )

more information on the Indigenous Sovereignty & Solidarity Network website.

Event Schedule for Nation to Nation Now: The Conversations

JOIN THE CONCERT ON FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/events/415882218506527/

FOLLOW  FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/events/567591896584499/

Post for Nation to Nation Now event red background with black bird

EXHIBITION: Human Rights Human Wrongs @ Ryerson Image Centre

Martin Luther King sitting with group of people standing around him
Image from www.torontoist.com.

EXHIBIT – Human Rights Human Wrongs
Curated by Mark Sealy of Autograph ABP

Runs until April 14

Main Gallery at Ryerson Image Centre, Ryerson U
More info on RIC’s website.

Inside gallery with long purple wall and framed black and white prints
Image from www.blogto.com.