CHILDREN WHO ARE SAFE & SOUND: Independent Jewish Voices holds Vigil in Ottawa for the Children Killed in Gaza

Little Palestinian girl holds candle

Little Palestinian boys hold posters, one little boy years sunglasses and Spiderman shorts

My maternal grandmother had 5 children. Then came 12 grandchildren. Now there are 9 great-grandchildren. With the exception of my grandmother, who lived a long and healthy life into her nineties, everyone is alive and well.

On the steps of the Human Rights Monument this Friday night in Ottawa, a Palestinian matriarch, with a cane in one hand and a flag in the other, slowly walked up to position herself in front of the faces of the children that have died in the recent attacks on Gaza. She smiled at the living children who ran up and down the steps around her in preparation for the ceremony. These children – in running shoes, cute sandals, sporty sunglasses and “The Amazing SpiderMan” shorts – are safe and sound in Canada.

Old woman on steps of Human Rights Monument holds waving Palestinian flag, posters of dead children behind her Old woman on steps of Human Rights Monument holds waving Palestinian flag

This woman is probably in her seventies meaning she was born at a time when Israel had already begun its war on Palestine. Her children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren have only known the story of war and never the story of peace.

I think again of my grandmother. She never had to witness the death of one of her children or grandchildren.

Adolescent Palestinian boy at microphone surrounded by other Palestinian children holding posters with images of the children who have died

One child walked to the microphone. Stumbling on his words with the cracking voice of an adolescent boy transitioning into a young adult, he shared with the crowd that this week 9 of his extended family were killed in Gaza.

9 members wiped out. I struggle as to how to act in this moment. He can’t be more than 13. He has probably known more deaths in his family then years of his life.

I want children to be able to be just children with grandmothers who watch over them with laughter without wondering if today will be the last time they see their little ones play.

#FreeGaza #FreePalestine

For more events by Independent Jewish Voices visit their website.

WHAT ARE THE ACTIONS THAT SAY WE STAND FOR PEACE?: Standing in Solidarity with Palestinians on Eid


Little Palestinian girl rests her arms on poster with images of the children killed. The poster reads Stop the Palestinian Holocaust
Two young woman hold small girls close to them as they listen to the ceremony. Each woman and girl wears a keffiyeh
Young woman a keffiyeh hijab holds a candle and listens
Young woman sits on steps and listens, crowds surround her in the background. Young boy with keffiyeh around his neck and Nike shoes sits on the sidewalk while adults stand around him
Several children hold posters with photographs of the children who have recently died in Gaza.Two young men wearing Palestinian flags like capes walk with candles in their handsA young woman in hijab smiles at the camera while she holds a candle, people of all races surround her also holding candles.Little boy in running shoes and shorts holds a candle, he points up to an adult man above him also holding a candle
Above images by Leah Snyder for Mixed Bag Mag. 

OMAR: Facts Are Stranger Than Fiction

Palestinian director Hany Abu-Assad succeeds again at telling an important story.

Mark Twain said that “truth is stranger than fiction” because “fiction is obliged to stick to possibilities; Truth isn’t” which makes the film Omar, the fictional account of three childhoods friends, even more devastating as this fiction is the plausible reality of those living today in occupied Palestine.

Palestinian Director Hany Abu-Assad’s film is a thriller and a love story. The movie twists and turns as quickly as the main character Omar runs through the narrow passageways of the Nablus medina to escape Mossad, the Israeli Secret Service. Amjad, one of the childhood friends, asks the others “Do you know how they catch monkeys in Africa?” By getting them addicted to sugar cubes. Amjad describes how they pour the sweetness into a hole just large enough for the monkey to stick his hand into but small enough he cannot pull out when the hunters descend. Trapped the monkey still clings to the cubes.

The sweetness of Omar’s love for his best friend Tarek’s sister is what keeps bringing him back to the hole eventually trapping him into the Mossad’s madness that turns friend against friend and lover against lover. There is no exit the characters can take for this story to end positively.

Poster for Israeli Apartheid Week with occupation wall and minaret in background

Israeli Apartheid Week 2014 and how you can help support the people of Palestine.

Last weekend as part of the Israeli Apartheid Week 2014 a group of poets gathered at Ryerson University in Toronto for Performances of Indigenous Resistance: Palestine to Turtle Island. What was witnessed in the recited words was the truth of oppression – that no matter its location the impact is echoed.

Writer Yasmine Haj:

“I do not want to appropriate resistance and neither do you. But stories, poetry, music, art, farming, dancing, singing, and laughter are beautiful because they baffle us with unanswered questions. Because they fumble with the idea of stability and fragility. Because they allow us to reconnect with each other and imagine a collective space of meeting. They help us see Haifa connected to Cairo and Beirut and help us see Turtle Island in its colourful past, deconstructing the grey buildings that occupy its present.”

Many must feel like the monkey trapped with his hand in the hole but perhaps a love story for land that unites a global movement for social justice may be the inspired sweetness to collectively dream a way out.

For more on Israeli Apartheid Week visit their website www.apartheidweek.org, Facebook Page and follow on twitter @ApartheidWeek & #ApartheidWeek.

Other groups and organizations working towards resolution for a free Palestine:

Independent Jewish Voices Canada

Coalition Against Israeli Apartheid

Beit Zatoun

Bottle of olive oil in foreground with CN Tower and skyscrapers in background Image by Leah Snyder for Mixed Bag Mag.

You can purchase Zatoun Olive Oil (truly the best olive oil in my opinion!!!) produced by a collective in Palestine at Beit Zatoun’s Toronto location in Mirvish Village – 612 Markham St. (1 minute from Bathurst subway stop on Bloor line, Markham St. exit)

“Proceeds are used to directly benefit Palestinian farmers and children living in occupied Palestine and to create awareness for peace in Palestine…Zatoun helps to create a context based in ordinary everyday life to view and discuss the situation in Palestine-Israel.”

In Ottawa Omar will be screening at the Bytowne Cinema Ottawa this week during the following times:

Mon, Mar 17, 4:45pm
Mon, Mar 17, 6:55pm
Tue, Mar 18, 9:10pm
Wed, Mar 19, 7:00pm
Thu, Mar 20, 4:45pm

Visit Bytowne Cinema’s website for full details.

FYI – Boycott Sabra Hummus. More information on Huff Po article talking about Sabra’s CEO Ronen Zohar.

“The protesters make noise, but they make noise to themselves,” he said. “It doesn’t have any influence on our business.”

Let’s make him eat his own hummus words!

 

THE FACES OF ARTIST PROJECT TORONTO 2013: Nissim Ben Aderet

black line drawing of abstracted figure of a man on white backgroundImage provided by Nissim Ben Aderet.

I focus on a continuous line that I choreograph the dance of life for.

“In one line, Nissim draws an entire world of human images that move through imagined space and that create the infinite motion of relationships and hierarchies amongst themselves. On one hand, more is hidden from the view than is revealed to him. On the other hand, viewing the work means rummaging through the depths of the soul that emerge from the images.”

I am an expressive artist, I use a technique of action painting. With this technique I don’t plan the idea beforehand. I draw free from logic.

black line drawing of group of figures abstracted on white background

I draw a single line that creates a world of human texture. In one motion, I form my sketch.

black line drawing of group of figures abstracted on white background

The figures move in an empty space and form an endless motion amongst themselves.

black line drawing of group of figures abstracted on white background

When viewers look at my artwork, they can understand my thoughts and read my story between the lines. This story is built upon harmony, balance, dependency, longing / nostaligia.

black line drawing of group of figures abstracted on white background

All of my work talks about the relationships between people. If you follow a line closely
you will discover an entire world of figures that connect with each other.

https://www.mixedbagmag.com/images/130222_tap_nissim-ben-aderet_001.jpg Images provided by Nissim Ben Aderet.

View more of Nissim’s work on his website.

Get ticket info for the show as well view all the participating artists at www.theartistprojecttoronto.com or follow along for updates @TAP_toronto & #TAP13.

logo for Toronto Artist Project 2013 in dark blue with image of woman in profile with veil like cutout over her eyes