#OTTAWA THIS WEEKEND: “Unikkaaqtuarniq – Stories from the North” #Inuit & #Sámi #Film Screenings Presented by @OttawaArtG & @AsinabkaFest

Warming up winter with free Indigenous film screenings.

Asinabka, one of Ottawa’s favourite summer film festivals, along with the Ottawa Art Gallery is presenting Unikkaaqtuarniq: Stories from the North just in time to celebrate Ottawa’s favourite season – winter! On Friday an outdoor screening will highlight Indigenous filmmaking from the Arctic and will include “a continuous looping program of short films by Inuit and Sámi filmmakers projected in a theatre made of snow.” 


The Orphan and the Polar Bear – Trailer from Taqqut Productions on Vimeo.

WHEN: Friday February 3 @ 5:30 – 8 pm & Saturday, February 4 @ 6 – 8 pm
WHERE: Lansdowne Park, 450 Queen Elizabeth Drive, Ottawa
FREE EVENT

More info on the Facebook Event Page.

**ADDITIONAL SCREENING ADDED**

WHEN: Saturday, February 18 @ 2 – 5 pm
WHERE: Gallery 101, 51 B Young Street, Ottawa
FREE EVENT 

More info here.

Presented in partnership with Skábmagovat film festival (Inari, Finland), the City of Ottawa, the Embassy of Finland, Gallery 101, the Ottawa Inuit Children’s Centre and Winterlude.

Also, part of the programming is award-winning filmmaker Alethea Arnaquq-Baril’s Angry Inuk

“In her film Angry Inuk, Inuit director Alethea Arnaquq-Baril joins a new tech-savvy generation of Inuit as they campaign to challenge long-established perceptions of seal hunting. Though most commercial sealing is conducted by Inuit in the Arctic, anti-sealing activism has created a perception of the industry that denies their central role in the sealskin market.”


Angry Inuk (Trailer) from NFB/marketing on Vimeo.

WHEN: Sunday, February 5 @ 1:30 pm & Monday, February 6 @ 9:20 pm
WHERE: Bytowne Cinema, 325 Rideau Street, Ottawa
FREE EVENT

More info on the Facebook Event Page

Presented in partnership with Asinabka Film & Media Arts Festival, Ottawa Art Gallery & Bytowne Cinema.

Other highlights include:

  • Performances by Indigenous Arctic artists
  • Ottawa premieres of the films “Winter” (Geronimo Inutiq), “Muittit” (Sámi music video), Dolastallat (Marja Helander)


#OTTAWA TONIGHT: Featuring #Indigenous #Artists “When Raven Became Spider” opens @ OAG Annex Gallery @ City Hall

Shaun Beyale, The Time Traveler, ink, gray Copic marker, and white Gellyroll pen on paper, 2015, courtesy Ottawa Art Gallery.

Curated by Leena Minifie When Raven Became Spider features 6 Indigenous artists whose work references superheros and ‘sheros.’

From the Ottawa Art Gallery:

“Taking its title from a Sonny Assu button blanket depicting Spiderman in a traditional Kwakwa̱ka̱’wakw style, When Raven Became Spider is guest curated by Vancouver-based Gitxaala/British, curator, artist and writer Leena Minifie. Minifie’s research examines supernatural characters in Indigenous art and modern comic superheroes. She notes that traditional stories often highlight figures with superheroic traits, but that these figures maintain complexity as they are fallible, and capable of making mistakes. Most pop comic icons lean towards the archetypal, exhibiting simplified ways of being; they are good or evil. This generation of Indigenous artists and storytellers are increasingly depicting modern super-beings and using pop icon images within their work, blurring the line between oral stories and modern comics. Their aesthetics, style, and composition flow between both worlds.

Does the use of these modern-day images generate a space for oral narratives related to super beings? Or does it reduce these characters into one-dimensional archetypes? Does this work make stories more accessible and palatable to audiences and listeners, who may not be familiar with storytelling traditions? Do modernized forms sacrifice a certain degree of the three-dimensionality and nuance of the characters they depict? Can these characters still transmit old-world, oratory tales and teach us something about the frail human condition, as they were intended?

When Raven Became Spider grapples with such questions.”

ARTISTS:

WHEN: Vernissage is Thursday, February 26 @ 5:30
WHERE: OAG Annex, City Hall, 110 Laurier Avenue West, Ottawa

The OAG Annex gallery is open daily from 9 am to 8 pm.
Free admission.  Wheelchair accessible. Parking available.
For more information: 613-233-8699 x234, info@ottawaartgallery.ca

Organized by:  Dunlop Art Gallery, Regina Public Library

 

WHY BUY: Ottawa Art Gallery’s #lepARTy2016 & why buying art matters

Ottawa’s art auctions create opportunities to strengthen the arts community.

My first month living in Ottawa I made a small purchase – a tiny black and white painting of a woman who stared out from the frame with an ambiguous gaze. The artist had rendered her with no legs. She ended at her torso where the edges of her baggy shirt stopped abruptly on the paper. She represented my feeling of being truncated due to no roots in the city I unexpectedly had arrived in. Two years later that same painting sits on my desk as a reminder of how deep my roots have grown and that I have found myself located in a thriving arts community. I bought this piece at a fundraiser art auction. The purchase I made will always be linked to the memory of that night and the inspiration I received from being in a city that supports the arts.

That night became the first of many local art auctions I  found myself attending, including Ottawa Art Gallery’s Le pARTy. They have become annual traditions that I don’t want to miss. I watch friends get into hot bidding frenzies in order to expand their art collections. I like having my calendar year punctuated by celebratory moments of people purchasing art. I like seeing the exhilaration people get when they invest in something that moves them. Off the wall the work comes and into their home it goes along with the story of the where and the why on how they acquired the work.

But it’s more than just buying the work, it’s about the relationships that are formed around the event – the planning and the people who put those plans into action, the artists who donate, the collectors who buy and the organizations that reach out their audience. It’s a feedback loop that, when done well, has the potential to benefit everyone in the community – the artists, the art lovers and local galleries and artist-run-centres.

Last year, at Le pARTy I watched (with envy) as a beautiful work went home with a lucky couple. That couple, Bridget Thompson and Danny Hussey (Central Art Garage) are known around town for being the kind of people who actively walk the talk and participate in multiple ways to encourage a healthy art scene in Ottawa. Danny shared with me that “as collectors both Bridget and I see the auction as a chance to connect with and support artists. We look for work by regional and Ottawa artists that are interacting with the broader Canadian and international art scene. We never really know ahead of time what if anything we will buy. One of the best parts of the art auction is meeting the artists and getting to know more about them. Once you make that bond it becomes natural to follow their careers and to continue to support them.”

“Caitlin” from Second Self Series by Meryl McMaster

The artist whose work they purchased last year, Meryl McMaster, is currently exhibiting locally at Ottawa’s Carleton University Art Gallery (CUAG). Meryl is one of many Ottawa artists whose reach is branching out beyond Ottawa. Nationally, Meryl’s work belongs to collections at the Art Gallery of Ontario and the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria as well as internationally at The Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian but despite her growing success home is where her heart still remains.

When I asked why she participates in OAG’s art auction she replied “I donate my work to Le pARTy primarily because I believe in the Ottawa Art Gallery is an important institution for Ottawa and I find it rewarding to support the work that they do, supporting local arts and bringing great artists to show in our city. Le pARTy is a good opportunity for artists to have their work viewed by a broad new audience and for art collectors to discover new artists that they are not familiar with. This all happens in a lively environment that allows artists to form new connections with people in their local community.”

At this year’s Le pARTy Danny isn’t just showing up as a collector, he is also playing an important role in the planning process of Thursday night’s now SOLD OUT event.

“From the administrative side, this year I am serving as Co-chair of the auction along with Hattie Klotz. There is so much that goes into the the event and such a long list of contributors. It would not be possible without the artists contributing work, the restaurants and caterers that donate their services and food, all of the corporate sponsors and dozens and dozens of volunteers. The staff at the OAG does a lot of the work behind the scenes and they should get a large share of the credit.”

Also lending a hand as well as adding a critical eye for
#lepARTy2016 is Vicki Heyman, wife of the US Ambassador to Canada. Known for the cultural tour de force she has brought to the Ottawa arts community with the Art in Embassies initiative including Contemporary Conversations at the National Gallery of Canada, Vicki is one of this year’s participating jurors.

“This is my third year attending Ottawa Art Gallery’s Le pARTy and my first time participating as a Critic. It was such an honor to be asked to participate in a deep way in Le pARTy – I feel strongly about supporting the OAG and the artist community here in Ottawa. The artists in the Ottawa area have such talent, and they are truly representative of the diverse narratives of Canadian stories, culture and heritage. It is always special to connect with and support local talent because you get the opportunity to experience the voice of the artist, not just the art, and develop rich relationships that often transcend the art itself. The Ottawa Art Gallery is a treasure in this city, and I am looking forward to the completion of the transformative expansion and redevelopment of the building and programming.”

As Ottawa gears up for the 2017 moment that includes the renovations of the Arts Court building and the Ottawa Art Gallery these events that bring us together grow in importance. And this Thursday, OAG’s Director Alexandra Bardak reminds us, “Le pARTy 2016 marks a special year for the Ottawa Art Gallery. This is both the 20th year of the event and the final year in our current spaces. Each of the art auctions over the past 20 years has been the result of our supportive community. The OAG is extremely thankful to all of our partners – from the artists who donate work, the guests who buy tickets and purchase artworks, the restaurants and caterers who supply food and drink, and the corporate and community partners who support the event. Many of these people have been with us from the beginning and we’re looking forward to celebrating with them on Thursday, June 9th.”
So why buy? Because along with a work you can love each day and a lasting memory of great event shared with friends you are also investing in the future of your community.It feels good to put your money where your heart (and your home) is.

Missed out on getting your Le pARTy ticket? You can attend the Pre Le pARTy event tomorrow night.

WHEN: Wednesday, June 8, 2016 Doors Open at 6 pm Panel begins at 6:30 pm
WHERE: Ottawa Art Gallery (2 Daly Ave)
TICKETS: Free! RSVP through Eventbrite

TOPIC: Where does photography fit within the contemporary art gallery?

“A panel discussion and Q&A with photo-based artists and photographers from Ottawa exploring the role of photography today both in and out of the public and private gallery space. An initiative started in conjunction with Le pARTy in 2014, Le pre pARTy consists of a lively panel, moderated this year by Michelle Gewurtz, Interim Senior Curator at Ottawa Art Gallery, followed by a Q&A and reception with music, mingling, hors d’oeuvres and beverages.

This free event also offers the opportunity to view the installed artworks available at Le pARTy in advance of the auction as well as the chance to purchase the Le pARTy Special Edition photograph portfolios a day early!”


Above images by Maija Hirsimaki courtesy of Ottawa Art Gallery.

ALEX & ALMA: Alex Colville Retrospective closing this weekend in Toronto & Alma Duncan next weekend in Ottawa

Alex Colville was never an artist I considered as an interest. The experience of viewing the Art Gallery of Ontario’s current retrospective of his work left me considering otherwise.

Alma Duncan was never an artist I even knew to consider but her painting Young Black Girl (1940) is one of my favourites in the AGO’s collection. I had no knowledge of Alma at the time but I was drawn to the demure painting that used to hang in the round room to the right of the Old Masters Collection along with a Picasso from his Blue Period, and a pulsating Kees van Dongen. The room held a rotation of portraits and this enigmatic and somber piece made me return again and again.

Now the painting hangs at the Ottawa Art Gallery for one more week. It is positioned on the wall that intersects Alma’s bold self-portraits that greet me with a commanding series of stares.

There are many ways to conceptually enter into both the Alma and Alex exhibits but my pathway into understanding their work more deeply is through the relationships that they each present.

ALMA DUNCAN: The relationship one has with oneself. 

Alma’s portraits of herself are entirely different than my introduction to her work through her subject of the black girl who sits slightly askew and closed off from the viewer. In each painting Alma positions herself squarely, looking beyond the frame to her audience. It’s as if she is daring those who might question her authority as an artist. She began painting at a time when the art world offered little opportunity for female intervention into male dominated spaces. Even as she paints her young self with braids bound at their ends with red bows (Self-Portrait with Braids, 1940) there is a clear message she sends as she stands affirming her right to participate. She paints herself wearing a pair of trousers instead of a skirt. When I encounter this row of paintings with such a strong female presence my thought is that I am disappointed that it took this long for me to find her.

In the main room, behind one dividing wall, are her renderings of mines and the machinery of industry from her time spent documenting a developing Canada focused on trade and resources; on the other side abstracted sketches of grass and landscapes softened with snow. We can see how far she travelled in her journey to explore her visual language but its when I enter the second room and experience the blood red wall upon which her Woman Series (1965) is hung that I have a longing accompanied by an intense regret that my younger self didn’t experience these at an earlier moment in my own odyssey.

I would have loved to have experienced her boldness in my youth when looking for creative and conceptual heros sheros. The clean cut demarcation between the black and the white is not set in opposition to each other but rather as a compliment from one to the other.

They are magnificent.

As I come closer I sense a movement in the shimmering of the strokes. It reminds me of the shadowy depictions of the Shroud of Turin also known as the Shroud of Christ. But this analogy is not quite right. Rather than a covering used for the dead I realize it reminds me more of a vibrating sonogram where you can detect a pulse, a heart beat, a life. This is why I find them so magnetic because as I walk towards a particulate one that draws me close I see the defining outline of a woman’s torso reflected upon itself emerging from the inky deep. Although she moves from realism in her early work to this period of experimentation with abstraction in the 60s the strength and intensity of that young woman with the braids and red bows is the anchoring attribute we find repeated here.

Alma’s work may visually change, flux and bend but the explorative relationship she has with herself as a female artist is what moves me. It’s why I find myself coming back to this newly discovered piece over and over again not wanting to say good-bye.

ALEX COLVILLE: The relationship one has with their lover and life partner.

When I am at the Alex Colville show its also a female relationship that grounds me into the exhibit. I make a few laps around the rooms, weaving in and out of the crowd, to finally sit down somewhere mid-point and watch a short film. The video is narrated by Alex’s daughter Ann Kitz and in a few short minutes she poignantly shares with us the timeline of her parents lifetime of love – a 70 year excursion that ends the way it began – together. Alex died just weeks after his wife’s passing.

Exploration by going deep instead of wide.  

After experiencing World War II in his role as a war artist and documenting the liberation at Bergen-Belsen concentration camp it seemed like his marriage, which took place right before he left for war, became the stabilizing factor upon which he was able to build a career alongside raising a healthy family. The partnership with his wife, Rhoda, also an artist, gave him a solid foundation after experiencing the uprooting tension of conflict.

It was through this relationship Alex was able to arrive at both his signature technique and his recognizable aesthetic. Of the painting Nude and Dummy (1950) seen below he reflects that this was when he accomplished what he called his “first good painting.” From this piece we are able to see what is about to come down the road.

His visual journey doesn’t traverse the same distance as Alma’s trajectories. His way of rendering his compositions remains uniform throughout his career. He doesn’t become driven to aesthetic extremes; his loyalty to his signature style allows a deeper exploration into the psychological subtleties of the human condition. Alex’s work was about looking and then re-looking at a location or a person you know so well to find both the consistencies and the anomalies that open up a contemplative space.  He was quoted as saying that “only by living in a little place for a long time can one build up a sort of extensive body of complex knowledge and understanding of what goes on.”

Alex is known for his compositions that convey foreboding messages of something disruptive beyond the horizon but in seeing many of the his works based on Rhoda there is also an undeniably playful spirit that comes through these images of this woman, his wife. We see her at leisure with the figure we can interpret as Alex in the background close enough to be at her call but far enough as to not disturb her relaxation; we see her with her pets and her children and playing the piano while her aging husband sits close by. Over their lifetime Alex portrays her nude and exposed but accessible in her humanness, flaws not banished for the sake of the artist reflecting a perfected muse. She is real and charming, a crisp outline of paint separates her from the background but because we never fully see her face this woman still manages to maintain complexity surrounded by mystery.

Her head is lost inside of a canoe that she portages to another place; she stands with acceptance, a body shaped by age, in front of the old grandfather clock in their home. The image I come to love the most is of Rhoda defiantly naked and flipping the perspective of the world upside down, the cat as a casual witness. I feel it illustrates the adoration Alex had for this woman, at once his muse and the mother of his children. I can sense a chuckle from him and hear laughter from her as she gingerly makes her way down to plant her feet back on the ground. Headstand (1982) becomes the image that I end up visiting again and gain and the one final time to say farewell as the show closes its doors.

Thanks to the AGO & the OAG for providing an opportunity to view the life and work of two important Canadian artists.

Alex Colville closes today Sunday, January 4 at the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto.
Alma: The Life and Art of Alma Duncan (1917 – 2004) closes Sunday, January 11 at the Ottawa Art Gallery, Ottawa.

All above images by Leah Snyder for Mixed Bag Mag. 

 

WHOLE LOT OF H’ART: A New Show of H’Art Ottawa Artists Opens at Ottawa Art Gallery

A whole lot of H’Art at Ottawa’s OAG.

Meeting with the Thursday Group of H’Art of Ottawa right before heading into the holiday weekend was a great idea. If anyone knows a thing or two about being thankful and present in a moment of appreciation it’s these women. Open arms welcoming me and lots of parting hugs as I said my goodbyes is what I got from the women who are part of one of the Ottawa Art Gallery’s current exhibits – Open Spaces.

It’s been a busy year for H’Art. Along with the show at OAG some other members are part of the Breaking Barriers show at the Diefenbunker. H’Art was also the inaugural show (Turning the Page) at the new Gallery 101 space and H’Art artist Irene Beck exhibited at SAW Gallery.

In Open Spaces each artist of H’Art’s Thursday group got a chance to dive into the online archives of the Firestone Collection for their inspiration. OAG is now the custodian of the collection that was begun by O.J. and Isobel Firestone, an Ottawa family that valued Canadian artists. They began collecting in the 1950s and their collection expanded to 1,600 works of art. The artists in the collection include names like Emily Carr, Paul-Émile Borduas, and Rita Letendre – names that show the diversity of background and style of artists working during the 20th Century in Canada. Rotating selections from the collection are always on view at Ottawa’s City Hall Art Gallery (the current home of the OAG Annex) and at OAG’s Firestone Gallery (where this exhibit is being held) but this show engages with the collection in a unique way. Each artist was asked to pull from the collection work that they would combine in a grouping with their own.

3 women dressed up at art opening

Curator Stephanie Nadeau (Curator of Public, Educational and Community Program at OAG) had already spent time volunteering with the women and had a strong rapport with the artists prior to the production of the show. Her special connection with the artists (Malinda Caron, Anna Coulombe, Jenny Francis, Carol Gregory, Christine Hammond, Jessie McComb, Debbie Ratcliffe, Alexa Vanveen, and Mandy Wellman) was evident the moment she stepped into the H’Art studio at the Bronson Studio last Thursday. It had only been a week since the opening but they expressed how much they were already missing Stephanie and her positive presence in their art practices.

Young woman holding a colourful painting of abstract feathers

Signature saying Jessie McComb

Under Stephanie’s guidance the women explored the digital archives to find works that spoke to them. Sometimes the searches were straightforward and other times more serendipitous. For Jessie McComb, who loves the ways ducks form V patterns as they fly, a random photo from a Google image search became part of her grouping that also includes works by Jacques de Tonnancour, A.J. Casson and AY Jackson. In a vitrine Jessie partnered Florence Wyle’s small plaster and iron casts Totem with her collection of rubber ducks. For her birds are the most beautiful thing and on Thursday she showed me a stunning new work of a circle of feathers looping back into each other.


Signature that says Jenny Marie Francis

An older work by Jenny Francis (The Smiling Pig) includes her signature motif of repetitive lines. The same lines are echoed in one piece she chose for her grouping – Norval Morriseau’s Bear-Fish. Jenny is a quiet spirit but her work is complicated and layered. Worlds inside worlds – you could spend hours exploring her visual vocabulary.


Signature that says Debbie Ratcliffe

Debbie Ratcliffe (aka “The Dragon Lady”) likes to construct elaborate narratives in her paintings that are informed by the novels she reads.  I love Debbie’s technique of grounding the images that build her story on top of an inky background. The way she renders her colourful compositions to involve her storytelling articulates her outgoing personality. What I found interesting about the choices she made was that for how detailed her own work is are she decided to pair her pianting with simple compositions – two paintings of landscapes (Alan Collier’s Near Squamish, B.C as well as H’Art artist Malinda Caron’s Mexico) and two paintings of homes (Alan Collier’s On the Spit, Homer, Alaska and Bay St. Lawrence, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia). For Debbie the image of a home is symbolic of life.

Collection of paintings on gallery wall

Signature that says Malinda

Malinda Caron selected an AY Jackson drawing of an iceberg because it made her recall a beautiful memory she had of seeing icebergs on a trip she took. It’s lovely piece that I have to say I much prefer over Jackson’s sketch! Malinda was really touched by her experience working with Stephanie, who she says is like a big sister. Along with working with her “big sister Steph” Malinda appreciates that each week she can create alongside her best friend of almost 15 years, Alexa Vanveen.

Signature that says Alexa

Alexa Vanveen’s way of engaging with the collection was to include a sound component. Some of the other ensembles include audio of the women sharing background about their work but here, in front of Alexa’s choices, she encourages us to have a seat and pause for awhile. Beatles tunes pump through the headphones while viewing Philip Surrey’s Listening to Music and three of Alexa’s own pieces – The Great Blueberry Pie, Strawberry Cheesecake with Lemon Squares and Music is My Life!

Relax for while and enjoy the space she has created for us to sit with the work.

Collection of paintings on gallery wall
Image of woman holding a colourful painting of butterflies

Signature that says Carol Gregory

Carol Gregory rediscovered her love of architecture and passion for buildings. As a child she was an avid reader on ancient architecture. Her choices from the Firestone Collection were works of small buildings against expansive horizons but in the works she produced after engaging with the collection she reflects the contemporary reality of how Canada has shifted from a rural population to an urbanized one. Her buildings are bigger and in Happy Day in Old Montreal the horizon is completely erased from view.

Signature that says Anna

Anna Coulombe is another H’Art collective artist who is interested in both landscapes and cityscapes. Her paintings are vibrant. She works with a gorgeous palette we don’t often see used to depict the landscape of Canada. I applaud Anna’s breaking with tradition and seeing the world through rainbow-coloured glasses! You can understand her selection of Marian Scott’s Quebec Fields from 1932 – kindred spirits connecting to each other through lines, form and most obviously colour!


Signature that says Mandy Wellman

Mandy Wellman asks us “Imagine that the sunset came close to you?” On the gallery wall beside her striking drawing of a section of the sun’s rays the question is written and posed to us. The work that she showed me at the studio was a collection of drawings on paper that incorporated great use of lines so it is of no surprise that she selected two Marian Scott works (Untitled, 1968 and Untitled, 1969) to partner with her own.

Signature that says Christine Hammond

The biggest hugger of the bunch is Christine Hammond and much like Debbie, she is a storyteller as much as she is a painter. Her paintings are filled with an array of animals going about their business. Illustrative in nature, she paints what she loves most! “I had a lion fetish as a kid and still do!”

One of the curatorial decisions Stephanie made with the assistance of the group was to have the signature of each artist cut in vinyl and placed on the wall. Another way that delineates each woman’s grouping is a band of colour at the base of the wall. Each artist decided on the colour that would represent them. A decision was also made to include audio of the women’s voices speaking to us about their practice, their passions, and their memories. The group process resulted in these meaningful details that allowed for each artist to mark the space in their own individual way resulting in nine distinct vignettes of nine wonderful women.

Before we left the studio that day the group presented Stephanie with a painting they knew she admired because it reminded her of organ pipes (Stephanie’s dad is in the organ business!). “Stephanie you are someone we trust more than anyone and you are always welcome here” Christine shared from her heart then the rest of the group chimed in with their praise for a woman who has become near and dear to them.

And along with their presentation to Stephanie came numerous farewell embraces. Through them and their process as artists we can learn a lot about warmth of the human spirit. Their openness and the generousity in the space they provide is both their asset in life and the gift they give to us.

Thank you Jessie, Jenny, Debbie, Malinda, Alexa, Carol, Anna, Mandy and Christine for a great morning!

Ladies – I will be back!

Open Spaces continues at the OAG until Jan 4, 2015.

Find out more about H’Art on their website as well as Facebook and twitter @HartStudioOtt.

Writing that says "Imagine if the sunset came close to you"

SUBTEXT AND THE CITY: Canada Know Your Brand


View from Museum of Civilization, Hull, Quebec while visiting the Indigenous & Urban Exhibit for Sakahàn.

The True North strong and free where nature is cherished and everyone lives happily ever after (?)

This place country we call Canada is kind of a mixed bag. ‘Multiculturalism’ in theory sounds welcoming but in practice can be problematic and is often accompanied by language that renders people tongue-tied and inarticulate.

So it’s easy to leave the talking to logos, slogans, and flags or monuments commemorating memories that are more complex than snapshot on vacay allows. But if you are willing to listen the city speaks!

Why not take a tour right now? If you click on each of the images below you can find out more about the work that’s in the picture as well as the artists and how each piece deepens the dialogue of the narrative of this nation.

Mixed Bag Mag would like to thank all the Cultural Provocateurs encountered while in the Capital visiting the National Gallery’s exhibit Sakahàn and offsite partner events. When it came to food for thought you each provided an all-you-can-eat buffet and I appreciate the exchange of ideas.

Harold Adler & Christopher Wong of Asinabka Film Festival

Jason Braeg – Artist / Curator and one of the founding members of the Aboriginal Curatorial Collective.

Chris Henderson – Authour of Aboriginal Power

Greg Hill – Audain Curator & Head of the Department of Indigenous Art at the National Gallery

Alexandra Nahwegahbow – Artist / Researcher @allgussied_up

Jeff Thomas – Artist / Curator and contributing Sakahàn artist

Ola Wlusek – Curator at Ottawa Art Gallery

Also it was a pleasure to meet one of the international Sakahàn artists’ Nicholas Galanin. Nicholas’ beautiful masks can be seen inside the exhibit but outside, for the next week or so, you can check out Nicholas carving out another commission at the back of the gallery right by Roxy Paine’s One Hundred Foot Line. Suggested donation for watching the performance of what I refer to as ‘artist chipping away’ – a double shot Americano.

Thanks as well to Amy from the UK for being the guinea pig upon which I practiced my tour guide abilities. And to my other bunk mate Candace – Welcome to Canada! May it be a wonderful new home for you!

MIXED BAG MAG recommends Niigaan’s Treaty Workshops:

Niigaan workshops use “blankets to represent the lands of what is now Canada, and the distinct cultures and nations which live on those lands to this day. Participants represent the First Peoples; when they step onto the blanket, they are taken back in time to the arrival of Europeans…the exercise goes through the history of treaty-making, colonization and resistance that resulted in the nation we today call Canada.”

“Anishinaabe prophecy tells of a time when two nations will join to make a mighty nation. These two nations are the original people of Turtle Island (today known as North America) and the settlers of this land. However, it is warned that this mighty peaceful nation will only be built if both nations choose the right path. We all must understand the history behind the current political and social relationship before we can begin the process of decolonization. The legal history includes the treaties of peace and friendship, the British North America Acts, Section 35 of the Canadian constitution, the Indian Act, and the legal duty to consult First Nations; all these agreements and legal documents influence our ability to go forward together on the right path.  Our history is littered with forgotten events, either deliberately overlooked, or rationalized away somehow.” (cited from Niigaan’s website)

Metal sculpture of native man in traditional attire kneeling with quills. Canada's Parliament Buildings in the background. Metal sculpture of two men and a woman in armed forces attire with words reconcilation underneath them and antique church spires behind them.
Facade of old stone building, tree branches and fence of boards with phrase Idle No More written on it.
Metal sculpture of native men in traditional attire with eagle spanning wings above their heads, wolf at their feet and building with Canada written on it in the background.






Above images by Leah Snyder for Mixed Bag Mag.