#CANADA150: National #CanFilmDay #Ottawa events celebrating #filmmakers & #film in #Canada

Angry Inuk and Rhymes for Young Ghouls screen in Ottawa tonight as part of National Canadian Film Day for Canada’s Sesquicentennial.

Today is National Canadian Film Day 150 (NCFD 150). This initiative is part of the Government of Canada’s Canada 150 Signature Projects. More than 1700 locations will be screening the best in Canadian film today, April 19, 2017 from “coast-to-coast-to-coast celebration of Canadian cinema in honour of our nation’s sesquicentennial.”  More information can be found at www.canadianfilmday.ca.

Tonight in Ottawa you can catch Angry Inuk at Gallery 101 or Rhymes for Young Ghouls at Ottawa University.

Angry Inuk (Trailer) from NFB/marketing on Vimeo.

ANGRY INUK
WHEN: 6:30 – 9:30 pm, Wednesday, April 19, 2017
WHERE: 51B Young Street, Ottawa
**Pay What You Can**
Register on the Facebook Event Page

RHYMES FOR YOUNG GHOULS
WHEN: 6:30 – 9:30 pm, Wednesday, April 19, 2017
WHERE: University of Ottawa Library, Morriset Hall, 1st Floor, 65 University
**FREE***
Register on Eventbrite  

This film fest is “the world’s largest film festival — ever. National Canadian Film Day 150 (NCFD 150) is a massive one-day” screening. The website has a complete event listing of all screenings. To find a screening in your town or city click here

Other ways to participate are watching a television broadcast or streaming / downloading a film online. CBC is streaming the following today:

  • Atanarjuat (The Fast Runner) – The telling of an Inuit legend of an evil spirit causing strife in the community and one warrior’s endurance and battle of its menace.
  • Away from Her – A man coping with the institutionalization of his wife because of Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Incendies – Twins journey to the Middle East to discover their family history, and fulfill their mother’s last wishes.
  • Last Night – At the turn of the century, the populous knows the world is coming to an end.
  • Manufacturing Landscapes
    Follow Edward Burtynsky through China as he photographs the country’s massive industrial revolution. It leads us to meditate on our impact on the planet.
  • Stories We Tell – A film that playfully excavates layers of myth and memory to reveal the truth at the core of a family of storytellers.
  • Sweet Hereafter
    A bus crash in a small town brings a lawyer to the town to defend the families.

Tweet your fave film to #CANADAFILMDAY!

#TORONTO TOMORROW: Fashioning #Reconciliation at #Ryerson University with @rskucheran

Decolonizing and Indigenizing the Fashion Industry.

This panel addresses one of the many places Reconciliation can occur in Canada, even in fashion!

WHEN: Wednesday, February 2 @ 3:10 pm
WHERE: George Vari Engineering & Computing Centre Rm 103, Ryerson University, 245 Church Street, Toronto

FEATURING: 

For the Winter 2017 semester with support from its Aboriginal Education Council, the School of Fashion at Ryerson University developed Aboriginal curricula for its mandatory first year course FSN 223: Fashion Concepts and Theory, instructed by Dr. Ben Barry, Associate Professor of Equity, Diversity & Inclusion. A lecture was researched and delivered by Ojibway MA Candidate Riley Kucheran, and a panel event featured Angela DeMontigny, Métis Fashion Designer; Sage Paul, Setsuné Indigenous Fashion Incubator; and J’net Ayayqwayaksheelth, Nuu-chah-nulth Textile Artist, Cedar Bark Weaver, and Indigenous Outreach and Learning Coordinator at the ROM. ‘Fashioning Reconciliation’ is a conversation about Truth & Reconciliation, Cultural Appropriation and Indigenizing the Fashion Industry.

Synaptic City Collection (2012) from Sage Paul website

 

#OTTAWA TONIGHT: #TipiConfessions hosted at #Carleton #University

Tipi Confessions Carleton: A Night of Indigenous Sexuality

A little bit about how Tipi Confessions came to be:

Tipi Confessions, inspired by BedPost Confessions and imported by Dr. Kim TallBear (Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate) from Austin, Texas, is a show that explores sex and sexuality through lenses of humour and vulnerability…Working closely with BedPost co-founders and producers, sex bloggers Julie Gillis and Sadie Smythe and sex podcaster Mia Martina, we followed their sexy storytelling structure of entertainment, ethics, and education for the inaugural Tipi Confessions during the Faculty of Native Studies Indigenous Masculinities Symposium. Performers Josh Whitehead, Billy-Ray Belcourt, Tashina Makokis, Kim TallBear, and Richard VanCamp brought the audience to tears with soul-baring spoken word and raunchy humourous play-by-plays. In January 2016, Carleton University School of Indigenous and Canadian Studies PhD student, Charlotte Hoelke, launched Tipi Confessions for a student audience in Ottawa. (read more on Facebook Page)

WHEN:Friday, January 27th @ 6 – 10 pm
WHERE: University Centre Atrium at Carleton University
FREE! Multiple Door Prizes from Venus Envy!

Featuring sexy appearances & performances by:

  • Howard Adler
  • Nathan Adler
  • Larissa Desrosiers
  • Geraldine King
  • Pemmican Milkshake

Emcees: Charlotte Hoelke & Tess Laude & your anonymous CONFESSIONS!

Have a listen to the first Tipi Confession session held at the University of Alberta Faculty of Native Studies at the Art Gallery of Alberta’s Ledcor Theatre.

“It was an evening full of fun, sexy, and heartbreaking poetry and spoken word performances by the beautiful and brilliant Joshua Whitehead, Billy-Ray Belcourt, Kim Tallbear, and Richard Van Camp. Your podcast host, Tashina Makokis, was also one of the performers of that night.”

#OTTAWA TOMORROW: The Canadian Film Institute hosts the amazing Alanis Obomsawin

The CANADIAN MASTERS Series welcomes Abenaki filmmaker Alanis Obomsawin.

This week NFB documentary filmmaker Alanis Obomsawin will be visiting Ottawa as part of the CANADIAN MASTERS series presented by the Canadian Film Institute in collaboration with Carleton University’s School For Studies In Art and Culture: Film Studies.

The Canadian Film Institute’s Canadian Masters series is an annual celebration of excellence in Canadian filmmaking, featuring extensive onstage interviews, special screenings, and audience discussions with some of the greatest names in Canadian film history. In our 2016-2017 inaugural season, we are honoured to present three extraordinary Canadian masters of the moving image: Atom Egoyan (November), Alanis Obomsawin (January), and Guy Maddin (March). more about the CFI

Alanis Obomsawin, OC, is filmmaker, singer, artist, storyteller of Abenaki descent (born 31 August 1932 near Lebanon, New Hampshire). One of Canada’s most distinguished documentary filmmakers, Alanis Obomsawin began her career as a professional singer and storyteller before joining the National Film Board of Canada (NFB) in 1967.

Her award-winning films address the struggles of Aboriginal peoples in Canada from their perspective, giving prominence to voices that have long fallen on deaf ears. An Officer of the Order of Canada, she has received multiple Governor General’s Awards, lifetime achievement awards and honorary degrees. (The Canadian Encyclopedia)

THURSDAY, JANUARY 26 – Alanis Obomsawin in Person: The Interview

7:30 – 9:30 pm
Arts Court Theatre, 2nd Floor of Arts Court, 2 Daly Avenue, Ottawa
$15 (+HST) Tickets available at the door and on sale here
Seating for the interview on January 26th is limited. Get your tickets early!
More info here

FRIDAY, JANUARY 27 – Screening of “We Can’t Make the Same Mistake Twice” with Alanis Obomsawin in Attendance

7 – 10 pm (doors open at 6:30 pm)
Theatre at Richcraft Hall (Formerly the River Building)
FREE!
More info here

 

OTTAWA TOMORROW: “Kanata 150?” critiques #Canada150

Image: Oo Aqpik “Crown for Sedna” 2016. Provided by Studio Sixty Six. 

Countering celebrations of nationalism with alternate narratives. 

Graduating just last year from Carleton University with a Masters in Art History, Rose Ekins has already made her mark on the Ottawa art scene with her ambitious programming at Studio Sixty Six, a commercial gallery located off of Bronson Avenue. Gallery owner Carrie Colton trusted Rose’s vision allowing her the opportunity to consider how a commercial gallery could also play a role in creating a space for art that wasn’t just about saleability but also about provoking tough questions. “I was able to carve out a mandate for myself” and that mandate includes diversity not only in the media that artists work in but more importantly cultural diversity and the stories that get communicated through the work. 

In an effort to offer a counter-narrative to the stories of nationalism that will be getting lots of air time in the 2017 celebrations of Canada’s Sesquicentennial, Rose has curated KANATA 150? a show that questions what the celebrations are about and who the celebrations are for. Featuring predominantly Ottawa based artists, KANATA 150? is “a nod to the origin of the country’s name,” and “presents seven emerging Indigenous artists reflecting on the nature of “Canada 150”.”

Image: Barry Pottle “Creeping South.” Provided by Studio Sixty Six

One of these artists is Barry Pottle, whose work documenting the Urban Inuit experience has previously been featured on Mixed Bag Mag. Also, the work of fellow Inuk, artist Oo Aqpik, will be presented in this show that roots Studio Sixty Six’s 2017 provocative programming that will include emerging artists Florence Yee (Menu of Exoticism) and Kosi Nnebe (Coloured Conversations) later on in the year. Originally from Nunavut, Oo is “well known for her roles in the Inuit language programs in television, radio and recently a feature film documentary, Arctic Defenders.” Like Oo, the artists of KANATA 150 are working in the capacity of activists and ambassadors of culture. Their work is about communicating to Canadians that it is a great risk if Indigenous perspectives, on where this country is headed, are not moved to the centre of all national debates. 

KANATA 150? opens tomorrow evening and promises to be an engaging way to start a critical year in Canada’s history. ARTISTS:

WHEN: Thursday, January 12 @ 6 – 9 pm
WHERE: Studio Sixty Six, 202-66 Muriel Street, K1S4E1

Free – Bar & Food
Physically accessible building
This event is taking place on the unceded territory of the Algonquin Anishinabeg Nation

“The City of Ottawa and Government of Canada are celebrating the 150th anniversary of the Dominion of Canada with events, promotions, and other ambitious goals to increase Canadian pride and patriotism. These festivities are promoting both the history and future of the nation state confederated in 1867. Canada is a country built from settler colonialism, which leaves the question of how the Indigenous peoples of this land are meant to participate in these celebrations. KANATA 150? (January 12 – February 18), a nod to the origin of the country’s name, presents seven emerging Indigenous artists reflecting on the nature of “Canada 150”.”

More info on the Facebook Event Page.

Follow Studio Sixty Six on Facebook, twitter and Instagram.

Image: Krystle Retieffe “Through the Looking Glass – 150 Years” 2016. Provided by Studio Sixty Six

#OTTAWA TONIGHT: Mino Bimaadiiziwin (A Good Life) Art Show at SAW Gallery

Visual Arts created by our local Indigenous Artists.

Tonight starts the first of many art openings this month in Ottawa. SAW Gallery will host Mino Bimaadiiziwin (A Good Life) Art Show. The show is part of the Aboriginal Youth Arts Entrepreneurship Program.

WHEN: Friday, January 6, 2017 @ 7 – 10 pm
WHERE: SAW Gallery, 67 Nicholas Street, Ontario

Traditional appetizers will be served through the evening as well as entertainment by various talented singing artists throughout the event.  

Entrance Fee by Donation.

Come on out!

The Parfleche by David Charette, 16″ x 20″, acrylic paint.

WHAT BEAUTY!: Alex Janvier retrospective opens to a full house at the National Gallery of Canada Ottawa

Denesuline and Saulteaux artist Alex Janvier’s paintings depict vibrant worlds.

I believe we are all given moments in life where if we pause to be still and present we will know that we have witnessed something truly extraordinary. In the expansive space of the Great Hall of the National Gallery of Canada last night, those of us that were there had the opportunity to feel the burden of history momentarily lifted by the presence of someone who has dedicated his body, mind and soul to beauty and to the upholding of his culture.

The crowd that came out was as expansive as the space. NGC Director Marc Mayer said that he had never seen the place so full for any previous opening. The turnout illustrated how well respected this internationally known artist is and affirmed the place that Indigenous artists hold in the consciousness of the Canadian public. 

At 81 years of age, Alex Janvier is a living legend. His paintings are vibrant expressions of dark emotions transformed via vivid memories of his culture that stayed located inside him despite being sent away to residential school. He spoke of his memories of women doing quill work and beading and the “special Friday from 2 to 4” where at school the children were given a few hours to paint. “It was the only time I could express what was down deep within and go back to the creator I believe in…go back to the inside of the little boy…where I wasn’t scared.” He went on to say that in his paintings “you will see what I talked about [the experience of residential school] but also the liberation from it.”

He shared these words on the same day as the US celebrate the arrival of the pilgrims on Plymouth Rock. On thanksgiving eve, in the twilight of the night fall, the backdrop of the American Embassy and Canada’s Parliament Hill was lit up and seen through the glass enclosure of the Great Hall. Ministers and MPs came out to express their admiration. An honouring song was sung. Dances performed. The word reconciliation uttered on more than one occasion.

Has Canada arrived at a new place in time? Has something changed? Perhaps reconciliation is less about a future moment to arrive at and more about a process to begin at.

Last night what we witnessed was the spiritual tenacity that comes from thousands of years of culture stretching back farther than the concept of ‘the West.’ Alex has spent his life time tapping into that “source” as he calls it. What he gave to us all was a gift, pointing to an imagined future in these troubled times. “I believe that this moment is meant for all of us to be here.”

If we accepted his gift, we experienced grace – one moment in a lifetime that has the possibility to change us all.

The exhibit runs through until April 17, 2017. More info on the Alex Janvier exhibit here.

Join curator Greg Hill in conversation with Alex Janvier Saturday, November 25 at 2 pm at the National Gallery of Canada. More info on the Facebook Event Page. Admission is FREE for all.

Images by Leah Snyder for Mixed Bag Mag.

CIRCLE PRESENTS: Leanne Betasamosake Simpson performers new work at Carleton University Ottawa

Leanne Betasamosake Simpson will perform songs from her new album “f(l)ight: Songs & Stories for a Radical Indigenous Present.”

Tomorrow evening CIRCLE (Centre for Indigenous Research, Culture, Language and Education at Carleton University) will be hosting Leanne as part of their series of events bringing Indigenous culture provocateurs to the Carleton campus. f(l)ight: Songs & Stories for a Radical Indigenous Present is Leanne’s newest album.

MORE ABOUT f(l)ight:

“f(l)ight is a new album of story-songs from acclaimed Michi Saagiig Nishnaabeg artist Leanne Betasamosake Simpson. Effortlessly interweaving Simpson’s complex poetics and multi-layered stories of the land, spirit, and body with lush acoustic and electronic arrangements, f(l)ight claims a unique space in contemporary Indigenous music and performance.

The album is a haunting, powerful hybrid of words, songs, and perspectives. From the gentle invocation of other forms of life offered in songs like “Road Salt” and “The Oldest Tree in the World”, to the dissonant sonics of “Caribou Ghosts and Untold Stories” and the pulsing, hypnotic rhythms of “Under Your Always Light”, Simpson’s words reverberate within and between the sounds that surround them.” Read more…

WHEN: Thursday, November 24 @ 7 – 8:30 pm
WHERE: Azrieli Theatre Rm 302, Azrieli Building, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Dr., Ottawa (Paid Parking at Library Parking Lot)

**FREE ADMISSION**

Check out Leanne performing with Anishinaabe / Nehayo singer Tara Williamson for Toronto’s Basement Revue.

Come on out!

Poster design by Leah Snyder for CIRCLE

IN REMEMBRANCE OF CHANIE WENJACK: CBC Airs Gord Downie’s “Secret Path” Tonight at 9 pm

This week Gord Downie premieres his project The Secret Path at the National Arts Centre and on CBC

I had the opportunity to attend the premiere of The Secret Path this past Tuesday at the National Arts Centre. It was not an easy event to get through. Gord Downie along with illustrator Jeff Lemire have created a work that invokes discomfort and deep pain – as it should.

Chanie (Charlie) Wenjack was a young Anishinaabe boy from Marten Falls First Nation. He was only one of 150,000 children that were taken from their parents and placed into residential schools often thousands of kilometres away. Far in physical and emotional distance, a large percentage of these children, an estimated 6000, never returned home.

The Wenjack family was present at the NAC and has been a part of this project to bring awareness not only to the past but also to the present – many Indigenous teenagers must leave their community to attend high school. Having high schools on all reserves would allow for kids to stay in their home communities. This is part of the message of Pearl Wenjack, Chanie’s sister, who shared with the audience at the NAC her memories of her little brother and her hope for his legacy.

Along with the production of The Secret Path video and album a foundation (The Gord Downie & Chanie Wenjack Foundation) has also been established to raise money for projects that promote opportunities for cross-cultural dialogue between Non-Indigenous and Indigenous communities. In the spirit of reconciliation, as Gord Downie says “It’s time to get started folks, we had the last 150 years, now we have the next.”

Tonight, Sunday, October 23 at 9 pm CBC will be airing The Secret Path.

To donate to the Wenjack foundation visit www.downiewenjack.ca.

Images by Leah Snyder for Mixed Bag Mag. 

 

 

 

THANKS-GIVING WEEKEND: Talented #Indigenous #Women coming to #Ottawa

This weekend the city of Ottawa hosts two talented women. Filmmaker Alethea Arnaquq-Baril will be screening her doc “TUNNIIT: Retracing the Lines of Inuit Tattoos” at Carleton University, a CIRCLE (Centre for Indigenous Research, Culture, Language & Education) event.

WHEN: Friday, October 7 @ 6-8:30 pm
WHERE: St. Patrick’s Building (Behind the Residence Commons) Rm 100 at Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6, Paid Parking Lot P6
*FREE ADMISSION**

On Saturday night  singer / songwriter Iskwé will be performing at the Mercury Lounge along with cellist Cris Derksen.

WHEN: Saturday, October 8 Doors Open @ 8pm Show starts @ 9pm
WHERE: Mercury Lounge
$12 Advance Tickets. More at the Door.

Visit the TUNNIIT Screening FB Event Page and ISKWE at Mercury Lounge FB Event Page for more information.