OPENING TOMORROW @ CENTRAL ART GARAGE: For NAC’s #CanadaScene the 007 Collective of #Ottawa based #Indigenous #artists responds to #Canada150


“It’s Complicated” artists portraits by Rosalie Favell.

IT’S COMPLICATED – Indigenous artists respond to Canada’s Sesquicentennial.

I have been looking forward to this show ever since I first heard the rumour it was going to be happening! Ottawa is home to a great community of Indigenous artists and as part of the National Arts Centre’s Canada Scene the 007 (Ottawa Ontario 7) will be showing at Central Art Garage, a small but mighty gallery located in Chinatown.

This is not the first show for 007. Artist Barry Ace started the collective as a way to create shows that were not curator focused but driven by the decisions and the desires of the artists.

The Ottawa Ontario 7 (OO7) are a group of Ottawa-based emerging, mid-career, and established artists who have come together as a collective for the sole purpose of presenting new work outside of the established curatorial practice and traditional institution art venues. The collective’s philosophy is unrestricted and provides each artist with the freedom and flexibility to take risks, experiment, or present works that are an extension of their current body of work. (read more…)

This year is the collective’s 5th year anniversary. Over the last 5 years 007 has shown in various venues in Ottawa but also at the Gladstone Hotel in Toronto as well as Five Myles Gallery in Brooklyn, New York. Each location the artist list changes to include Indigenous artists practicing in that particular city.  And at each show new artists are given the role of “special agent.” This year the role goes to Barry Pottle, Joi T. Arcand and Meryl McMaster. The other artists featured:


Joi Arcand, kiyām, neon chanel sign, 40.5 x 18, 2017 (www.centralartgarage.com)

This year’s show is in response to #Canada150. Along with the opening there will be a panel discussion and film screening. The panel “will reflect on the five-year anniversary of the OO7 Collective and Special Agents, including their formation and exhibition history. The artists will also share their personal views and response to Canada’s sesquicentennial celebrations in 2017 through a poignant discussion on their works of art in the Central Art Garage exhibition It’s Complicated.”

To Indigenous peoples of this land, from coast to coast to coast, 150 years represents a very minuscule passage of time, especially in terms of the longstanding presence and occupation of homeland territories. Yet this seemingly fleeting moment in time is monumental in its impact on Indigenous communities, culture, language, identity, rights, water, and land.

This exhibition by 10 Indigenous artists working in diverse artistic practices offers an alternative perspective to the widely propagated Canada 150 celebrations by revealing timely and poignant aspects of the convoluted historical and contemporary relationship between Canada and Indigenous peoples. If there is any room for celebration in 2017 from an Indigenous perspective, it is a celebration of survivance, tenacity, and perseverance. It’s a complicated celebration. (read more…)

 

SCHEDULE: 

4 PM PANEL DISCUSSION

The panel will include artists Barry Ace, Howard Adler, Rosalie Favell, Meryl McMaster, Ron Noganosh, Frank Shebageget, and Leo Yerxa.

7-10 PM OPENING

Please join the artists for a sneak preview of the exhibition following the discussion. Food and beverages will be available for purchase, hosted by The Belmont restaurant.

9 PM SCREENING

Special Guest Outdoor Film Screening by Howard Adler (Co-director of Asinabka Film and Media Festival)

The exhibition opening will include a screening of a new film work by Howard Adler at 9:00 p.m.

Join the Facebook Event Page for more info.

Happening now: Installation of Barry Ace's Kitchi Zibi Omàmìwininì Anishinàbe. OO7 Collective, It's Complicated….

Posted by Central Art Garage on Tuesday, June 13, 2017

#OTTAWA TONIGHT: #TipiConfessions hosted at #Carleton #University

Tipi Confessions Carleton: A Night of Indigenous Sexuality

A little bit about how Tipi Confessions came to be:

Tipi Confessions, inspired by BedPost Confessions and imported by Dr. Kim TallBear (Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate) from Austin, Texas, is a show that explores sex and sexuality through lenses of humour and vulnerability…Working closely with BedPost co-founders and producers, sex bloggers Julie Gillis and Sadie Smythe and sex podcaster Mia Martina, we followed their sexy storytelling structure of entertainment, ethics, and education for the inaugural Tipi Confessions during the Faculty of Native Studies Indigenous Masculinities Symposium. Performers Josh Whitehead, Billy-Ray Belcourt, Tashina Makokis, Kim TallBear, and Richard VanCamp brought the audience to tears with soul-baring spoken word and raunchy humourous play-by-plays. In January 2016, Carleton University School of Indigenous and Canadian Studies PhD student, Charlotte Hoelke, launched Tipi Confessions for a student audience in Ottawa. (read more on Facebook Page)

WHEN:Friday, January 27th @ 6 – 10 pm
WHERE: University Centre Atrium at Carleton University
FREE! Multiple Door Prizes from Venus Envy!

Featuring sexy appearances & performances by:

  • Howard Adler
  • Nathan Adler
  • Larissa Desrosiers
  • Geraldine King
  • Pemmican Milkshake

Emcees: Charlotte Hoelke & Tess Laude & your anonymous CONFESSIONS!

Have a listen to the first Tipi Confession session held at the University of Alberta Faculty of Native Studies at the Art Gallery of Alberta’s Ledcor Theatre.

“It was an evening full of fun, sexy, and heartbreaking poetry and spoken word performances by the beautiful and brilliant Joshua Whitehead, Billy-Ray Belcourt, Kim Tallbear, and Richard Van Camp. Your podcast host, Tashina Makokis, was also one of the performers of that night.”

ASINABKA CELEBRATES 5 YEARS: #Indigenous #Film #Media #Arts #Festival on #Algonquin #Territory #Ottawa

Asinabka Film and Media Arts Festival returns to Ottawa for another year of unique programming.

This year Ottawa’s locally minded but internationally connected Film and Media Arts Festival, Asinabka, turns five. I have been attending this annual festival for the last 3 years and I am looking forward to my 4th year. I have seen it mature and grow its audience while still maintaining an important discourse with the local community of Ottawa especially regarding issues impacting Indigenous communities here on Algonquin Territory. Co-Director / Programmer Howard Adler shares that as “Asinabka Festival returns for our 5th year we couldn’t be more excited about our programming and our local and international partnerships.”

Each year the festival opens on Victoria Island at the site of Aboriginal Experiences, a beautiful location that foregrounds the Indigenous opening night film against the background of Parliament Hill and the Supreme Court of Canada – a highly symbolic vista. This year’s festival opens with Fire Song (Director Adam Garnet Jones), a film about youth suicide, sexuality, family obligations and future options.

Prior to the screening Indigenous Walks will be giving a tour that will begin at the Human Rights Monument (Elgin Street by City Hall) and end at the island where there will be a feast provided to the festival goers to share before the screening begins. Regarding the 2016 Festival programming “this is no doubt our most ambitious festival yet, showcasing more Indigenous film, media art, music, and performance than ever before, utilizing two of Ottawa’s best artist-run Centre’s for our Gallery Crawl (Gallery 101 & SAW), and continuing with our stunning traditional opening night welcome and outdoor film screening on Victoria Island!” states Howard. “There will be more delegates, filmmakers, and guests attending our festival than ever before, and there’s not enough room here to express how excited and thankful we are to host and present so much amazing art! Chi-Miigwech to everyone involved and to our faithful audience who return every year.

Work by Geronimo Inutiq. Image provided by Asinabka. 

Also this year Inuk media artist Geronimo Inutiq will have a solo show (ᐃᓱᒪᒋᓇᒍ – isumaginagu – don’t think anything of it) opening at Gallery 101 (51 Young St. Suite B). Regarding his contribution and involvement Geronimo says that Asinabka “gives us an opportunity to show and see contemporary original art works in a context that goes beyond inter-national boundaries. I am grateful and honoured to exhibit my work with video and images, and – with the Festival – help push the boundaries of what indigenous and Inuit media and art can be today.” 

A little bit about the show:

How do you feel? Have you listened to your instinct today? What is your gut telling you? All the combined fields of natural and social sciences have elucidated great intellectual theories as to the nature and function of what we do and the reasons and functionality behind it. To Geronimo Inutiq, the process of artistic expression is an alternative language to all that. Guided by some sort of arbitrary intuition and abstract sense of aesthetics, he produces cultural artefacts that have been shown in galleries and museums in the context of contemporary indigenous and Inuit art exhibits and performance – both nationally and internationally. read more…

“Cowboys N’ Indians” by Alison Bremner in “Neon NDN.” Image provided by Asinabka. 

“Urban Inuk” Jocelyn Piirainen is an “emerging curator with a growing interest in indigenous contemporary art. Her entry into the curatorial world began in with the first ever Indigenous Curatorial Incubator program, where she put together the “UnMENtionables” screening program and helped coordinate the “Memories of the Future” exhibition for the 2015 Asinabka Film and Media Arts Festival.”  This year Jocelyn returns to Asinabka to curate Neon NDN: Indigenous Pop-Art Exhibition at SAW Gallery (Arts Court Building, 67 Nicolas St.).

From her curatorial statement:

In an article titled “Is There an Indigenous Way to Write about Indigenous Art?”, Richard William Hill recently contemplated “in purely practical terms, how would you bracket off Indigenous culture? Where do you draw the line? No more pop culture?”Had certain Indigenous artists bracketed off pop culture, Neon NDN would have been something quite different. In this Information Age, pop culture is everywhere and it’s not surprising many contemporary Indigenous artists engage with popular characters from film, television, video games, comic books, even corporate symbols and brand names. Through interacting with, reclaiming, and repurposing popular culture, Indigenous artists challenge a number of stereotypes and Hollywood tropes that have been set against Indigenous people and culture. read more…

Jocelyn states that “for this show, I really just wanted to create a sense of fun and bring in lots of colour. The theme is pop art – and for Indigenous artists, this theme isn’t quite so new as one might think.”

Both shows open on Saturday, August 13 and their will be Gallery Crawl with a FREE Shuttle bus provided. The bus will leave SAW Gallery after the 3 pm screening (OKA Legacy) wraps up. The bus will leave Gallery 101 to head back to SAW after the opening of Geronimo’s show that also includes a FREE BBQ. Neon NDN‘s vernissage will begin at 7:30 pm. Stay for the Music Night that will start at 9 pm.

From the Opening Night at Victoria Island to the closing party at Kinki Lounge (41 York St. in the Byward Market) you can find the best in contemporary Indigenous film, media and visual arts at multiple venues across the city from Wednesday, August 10 to Sunday, August 14, 2016.

For the full schedule click here.

Follow on Facebook & twitter @asinabkafest.

Images by Leah Snyder for Mixed Bag Mag unless otherwise noted.