#URBANISMLAB #OTTAWA: #Canadian Identity, #Heritage & the Legacies of the Centennial in 1967

The National Capital Commission hosts talk on heritage conservation and nation building.

If you are in the Ottawa area a great regular event is the Capital Urbanism Lab Lecture Series offered by the National Capital Commission (NCC). The NCC is a Crown Corporation that manages federal lands, and “nationally significant public places” in and around Ottawa playing a role in heritage conservation in the National Capital Region. Their Urbanism Lab gathers to it experts in design, architecture, city building and heritage who rethink and reconsider our approaches to creating communities that work for everyone. Past speaker topics have included Indigenous Place Making and Youth Engagement in City Building. Upcoming lectures in 2018 will be focused on topics such as Canadian Design as a Cultural Export and The Capital and a Healthy 10-Minute Neighbourhood.  Past lectures are all archived on the NCC’s Youtube Channel.

Tonight’s lecture, Heritage, circa 1967, will focus on heritage projects that came into being during Canada’s Centennial year in 1967. That time was a moment of national building much like we see now with the Sesquicentennial and Canada 150. Reflection on nation building moments are critical for understanding how processes can compound the problems instead of inspiring new ways of sharing and co-existing in spaces that are often contested and problematic in how they position dominant culture at the expense of other members of a community. Come on out tonight and participate in conversations around creating better communities.

Heritage, circa 1967: The lessons and legacy of Canada’s centennial in the Capital and beyond

WHEN: Wednesday, October 11, 2017 @ 6:30 – 8:30 pm
WHERE: National Capital Commission, 202-40 Elgin Street, Ottawa, K1P 1C7

This is a free event. More information on the NCC’s website.

OPENING TOMORROW @ CENTRAL ART GARAGE: For NAC’s #CanadaScene the 007 Collective of #Ottawa based #Indigenous #artists responds to #Canada150


“It’s Complicated” artists portraits by Rosalie Favell.

IT’S COMPLICATED – Indigenous artists respond to Canada’s Sesquicentennial.

I have been looking forward to this show ever since I first heard the rumour it was going to be happening! Ottawa is home to a great community of Indigenous artists and as part of the National Arts Centre’s Canada Scene the 007 (Ottawa Ontario 7) will be showing at Central Art Garage, a small but mighty gallery located in Chinatown.

This is not the first show for 007. Artist Barry Ace started the collective as a way to create shows that were not curator focused but driven by the decisions and the desires of the artists.

The Ottawa Ontario 7 (OO7) are a group of Ottawa-based emerging, mid-career, and established artists who have come together as a collective for the sole purpose of presenting new work outside of the established curatorial practice and traditional institution art venues. The collective’s philosophy is unrestricted and provides each artist with the freedom and flexibility to take risks, experiment, or present works that are an extension of their current body of work. (read more…)

This year is the collective’s 5th year anniversary. Over the last 5 years 007 has shown in various venues in Ottawa but also at the Gladstone Hotel in Toronto as well as Five Myles Gallery in Brooklyn, New York. Each location the artist list changes to include Indigenous artists practicing in that particular city.  And at each show new artists are given the role of “special agent.” This year the role goes to Barry Pottle, Joi T. Arcand and Meryl McMaster. The other artists featured:


Joi Arcand, kiyām, neon chanel sign, 40.5 x 18, 2017 (www.centralartgarage.com)

This year’s show is in response to #Canada150. Along with the opening there will be a panel discussion and film screening. The panel “will reflect on the five-year anniversary of the OO7 Collective and Special Agents, including their formation and exhibition history. The artists will also share their personal views and response to Canada’s sesquicentennial celebrations in 2017 through a poignant discussion on their works of art in the Central Art Garage exhibition It’s Complicated.”

To Indigenous peoples of this land, from coast to coast to coast, 150 years represents a very minuscule passage of time, especially in terms of the longstanding presence and occupation of homeland territories. Yet this seemingly fleeting moment in time is monumental in its impact on Indigenous communities, culture, language, identity, rights, water, and land.

This exhibition by 10 Indigenous artists working in diverse artistic practices offers an alternative perspective to the widely propagated Canada 150 celebrations by revealing timely and poignant aspects of the convoluted historical and contemporary relationship between Canada and Indigenous peoples. If there is any room for celebration in 2017 from an Indigenous perspective, it is a celebration of survivance, tenacity, and perseverance. It’s a complicated celebration. (read more…)

 

SCHEDULE: 

4 PM PANEL DISCUSSION

The panel will include artists Barry Ace, Howard Adler, Rosalie Favell, Meryl McMaster, Ron Noganosh, Frank Shebageget, and Leo Yerxa.

7-10 PM OPENING

Please join the artists for a sneak preview of the exhibition following the discussion. Food and beverages will be available for purchase, hosted by The Belmont restaurant.

9 PM SCREENING

Special Guest Outdoor Film Screening by Howard Adler (Co-director of Asinabka Film and Media Festival)

The exhibition opening will include a screening of a new film work by Howard Adler at 9:00 p.m.

Join the Facebook Event Page for more info.

Happening now: Installation of Barry Ace's Kitchi Zibi Omàmìwininì Anishinàbe. OO7 Collective, It's Complicated….

Posted by Central Art Garage on Tuesday, June 13, 2017