THIS WEEK IN OTTAWA & TORONTO: #BlackHistoryMonth ends but the contemporary influence continues

Club SAW hosts Black History Month Doc & Talk in partnership with One World Film Festival. 

WHAT: Screening of Invisible City
WHERE: Club SAW at 67 Nicholas Street, Ottawa
WHEN: Thursday, February 25 at 7 pm
COST: Suggested donation is $5 for the general public & $4 for One World Arts members. **Seating is limited**

One World Arts and the One World Film Festival are marking Black History Month with a screening of the award-winning documentary INVISIBLE CITY and a post-film talk with Saide Sayah  (Program Manager for the Affordable Housing Unit at the City of Ottawa) and Chelby Daigle (Community activist and long-term resident of social housing).

The evening will also feature a new Heritage Minute about Canadian civil rights icon Viola Desmond, a Nova Scotian woman who challenged racial segregation and is often referred to as “Canada’s Rosa Parks,” courtesy of Historica Canada.

INVISIBLE CITY follows the lives of two black teens from Toronto’s Regent Park neighbourhood, Kendell and Mikey, as they make the transition from adolescence to adulthood. Their mothers and mentors root for them to succeed as the teens grapple with issues of race, crime and notions of manhood and the social pressures of an environment that places them at risk.

Turning his camera on the often ignored inner city, Oscar-nominated director Hubert Davis sensitively depicts the disconnection of urban poverty and race from the mainstream. INVISIBLE CITY was the winner the Best Canadian Feature award at the 2009 Hot Docs Canadian International Documentary Festival.

Click here to join, like and share this event on Facebook!

More on Invisible City director Hubert Davis on this BlogTO article.

Also, this week INTERGALACTIC NOISE:: A partnership between Black Future Month & the Art Gallery Mississauga 

WHAT: Panel Discussion and Reception
WHERE: Art Gallery of Mississauga
WHEN: Friday, February 26 at 7 – 10 pm

Intergalactic Noise invites a re-engagement with the concept of Black History Month, as artists, designers, and multi-media creatives explore the concept of Afrofuturism. In using the date of 3016, Black Future Month offers an entry point to imagine utopic Black realities beyond the assigned month. Rather than accepting a naïve concept of a future full of advanced technology, the featured artists instead contemplate the possibilities of an advanced humanity.

Exhibiting artists:

  • Sherrae Lyon
  • Quentin VerCetty
  • Danilo McCallum
  • Ekow Nimako

Amanda Parris, host of CBC’s arts & culture programme Exhibitionists moderates a discussion between artists Camille Turner, Ekow Nimako, and Quentin Vercetty.

Join the INTERGALATIC NOISE:: Facebook Event Page for more information

***FREE TRANSPORTATION TO AND FROM THE AGM via BUS! 
BUS PICK-UP LOCATION: GLADSTONE HOTEL (1214 QUEEN ST. W, Toronto) AT 5:30PM.***

upclose shot of black man's hands holding a pink lego mask
Mask by Ekow Nimako. Image by Leah Snyder for Mixed Bag Mag.

 

#WALK4YOUTHARTS: Stepping out in Support of Cultural Programming for Toronto’s Youth

“We need to hone and cultivate a group of artists right now that really know who they are, know how they fit into their broader community and then have a message. We need to provide spaces…where an emerging artist can be given a space where they have critical thought and get to know who they are and how they fit into the continuum of art and art history…how they can shape and change the way that the future can look”  ~ Che Kothari, founder of Manifesto

As part of the Manifesto Festival, Walk for Youth Arts was a parade down Toronto’s Yonge Street that brought out arts activists, community leaders and cultural provocateurs to bring awareness and rally support to keep our city’s youth programs diverse, accessible and funded!

To give an idea as to the importance of these programs in the lives of the youth that attend check out these videos on some of the initiatives you can find in Toronto.

“The young people involved are here because they are innovative, because they are passionate because they are creative and in this city something is happening that I don’t think has happened before, not youth organizing, that has happened before but youth organizing that has the potential to be sustainable, that has the potential to create real change, not change that’s only going to be around for two or three years but change that could actually alter the fabric of the way this society is operating and that is amazing!” Amanda Parris, Playwright & Performer

“Using art as a vehicle for social change is something I live by” ~ Boonaa Mohammed, Spoken Word Poet & Storyteller

To view more videos on the talent, vision and action of organizations and projects who are changing the landscape of this city MIXED BAG MAG recommends visiting the Walk for Youth Arts Blog.

Keep updated on how you can support this cause by following along on Facebook and on Twitter at #Walk4YouthArts.

Thanks to Muna of www.gashantiunity.ca, Amanda of www.urbanartstoronto.org and Sas of Get Sassy Creations for taking the time to talk to MIXED BAG MAG about their projects!

















Photography by Leah Snyder for Mixed Bag Mag.