#CANADA150: National #CanFilmDay #Ottawa events celebrating #filmmakers & #film in #Canada

Angry Inuk and Rhymes for Young Ghouls screen in Ottawa tonight as part of National Canadian Film Day for Canada’s Sesquicentennial.

Today is National Canadian Film Day 150 (NCFD 150). This initiative is part of the Government of Canada’s Canada 150 Signature Projects. More than 1700 locations will be screening the best in Canadian film today, April 19, 2017 from “coast-to-coast-to-coast celebration of Canadian cinema in honour of our nation’s sesquicentennial.”  More information can be found at www.canadianfilmday.ca.

Tonight in Ottawa you can catch Angry Inuk at Gallery 101 or Rhymes for Young Ghouls at Ottawa University.

Angry Inuk (Trailer) from NFB/marketing on Vimeo.

ANGRY INUK
WHEN: 6:30 – 9:30 pm, Wednesday, April 19, 2017
WHERE: 51B Young Street, Ottawa
**Pay What You Can**
Register on the Facebook Event Page

RHYMES FOR YOUNG GHOULS
WHEN: 6:30 – 9:30 pm, Wednesday, April 19, 2017
WHERE: University of Ottawa Library, Morriset Hall, 1st Floor, 65 University
**FREE***
Register on Eventbrite  

This film fest is “the world’s largest film festival — ever. National Canadian Film Day 150 (NCFD 150) is a massive one-day” screening. The website has a complete event listing of all screenings. To find a screening in your town or city click here

Other ways to participate are watching a television broadcast or streaming / downloading a film online. CBC is streaming the following today:

  • Atanarjuat (The Fast Runner) – The telling of an Inuit legend of an evil spirit causing strife in the community and one warrior’s endurance and battle of its menace.
  • Away from Her – A man coping with the institutionalization of his wife because of Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Incendies – Twins journey to the Middle East to discover their family history, and fulfill their mother’s last wishes.
  • Last Night – At the turn of the century, the populous knows the world is coming to an end.
  • Manufacturing Landscapes
    Follow Edward Burtynsky through China as he photographs the country’s massive industrial revolution. It leads us to meditate on our impact on the planet.
  • Stories We Tell – A film that playfully excavates layers of myth and memory to reveal the truth at the core of a family of storytellers.
  • Sweet Hereafter
    A bus crash in a small town brings a lawyer to the town to defend the families.

Tweet your fave film to #CANADAFILMDAY!

#OTTAWA THIS WEEKEND: “Unikkaaqtuarniq – Stories from the North” #Inuit & #Sámi #Film Screenings Presented by @OttawaArtG & @AsinabkaFest

Warming up winter with free Indigenous film screenings.

Asinabka, one of Ottawa’s favourite summer film festivals, along with the Ottawa Art Gallery is presenting Unikkaaqtuarniq: Stories from the North just in time to celebrate Ottawa’s favourite season – winter! On Friday an outdoor screening will highlight Indigenous filmmaking from the Arctic and will include “a continuous looping program of short films by Inuit and Sámi filmmakers projected in a theatre made of snow.” 


The Orphan and the Polar Bear – Trailer from Taqqut Productions on Vimeo.

WHEN: Friday February 3 @ 5:30 – 8 pm & Saturday, February 4 @ 6 – 8 pm
WHERE: Lansdowne Park, 450 Queen Elizabeth Drive, Ottawa
FREE EVENT

More info on the Facebook Event Page.

**ADDITIONAL SCREENING ADDED**

WHEN: Saturday, February 18 @ 2 – 5 pm
WHERE: Gallery 101, 51 B Young Street, Ottawa
FREE EVENT 

More info here.

Presented in partnership with Skábmagovat film festival (Inari, Finland), the City of Ottawa, the Embassy of Finland, Gallery 101, the Ottawa Inuit Children’s Centre and Winterlude.

Also, part of the programming is award-winning filmmaker Alethea Arnaquq-Baril’s Angry Inuk

“In her film Angry Inuk, Inuit director Alethea Arnaquq-Baril joins a new tech-savvy generation of Inuit as they campaign to challenge long-established perceptions of seal hunting. Though most commercial sealing is conducted by Inuit in the Arctic, anti-sealing activism has created a perception of the industry that denies their central role in the sealskin market.”


Angry Inuk (Trailer) from NFB/marketing on Vimeo.

WHEN: Sunday, February 5 @ 1:30 pm & Monday, February 6 @ 9:20 pm
WHERE: Bytowne Cinema, 325 Rideau Street, Ottawa
FREE EVENT

More info on the Facebook Event Page

Presented in partnership with Asinabka Film & Media Arts Festival, Ottawa Art Gallery & Bytowne Cinema.

Other highlights include:

  • Performances by Indigenous Arctic artists
  • Ottawa premieres of the films “Winter” (Geronimo Inutiq), “Muittit” (Sámi music video), Dolastallat (Marja Helander)


ASINABKA CELEBRATES 5 YEARS: #Indigenous #Film #Media #Arts #Festival on #Algonquin #Territory #Ottawa

Asinabka Film and Media Arts Festival returns to Ottawa for another year of unique programming.

This year Ottawa’s locally minded but internationally connected Film and Media Arts Festival, Asinabka, turns five. I have been attending this annual festival for the last 3 years and I am looking forward to my 4th year. I have seen it mature and grow its audience while still maintaining an important discourse with the local community of Ottawa especially regarding issues impacting Indigenous communities here on Algonquin Territory. Co-Director / Programmer Howard Adler shares that as “Asinabka Festival returns for our 5th year we couldn’t be more excited about our programming and our local and international partnerships.”

Each year the festival opens on Victoria Island at the site of Aboriginal Experiences, a beautiful location that foregrounds the Indigenous opening night film against the background of Parliament Hill and the Supreme Court of Canada – a highly symbolic vista. This year’s festival opens with Fire Song (Director Adam Garnet Jones), a film about youth suicide, sexuality, family obligations and future options.

Prior to the screening Indigenous Walks will be giving a tour that will begin at the Human Rights Monument (Elgin Street by City Hall) and end at the island where there will be a feast provided to the festival goers to share before the screening begins. Regarding the 2016 Festival programming “this is no doubt our most ambitious festival yet, showcasing more Indigenous film, media art, music, and performance than ever before, utilizing two of Ottawa’s best artist-run Centre’s for our Gallery Crawl (Gallery 101 & SAW), and continuing with our stunning traditional opening night welcome and outdoor film screening on Victoria Island!” states Howard. “There will be more delegates, filmmakers, and guests attending our festival than ever before, and there’s not enough room here to express how excited and thankful we are to host and present so much amazing art! Chi-Miigwech to everyone involved and to our faithful audience who return every year.

Work by Geronimo Inutiq. Image provided by Asinabka. 

Also this year Inuk media artist Geronimo Inutiq will have a solo show (ᐃᓱᒪᒋᓇᒍ – isumaginagu – don’t think anything of it) opening at Gallery 101 (51 Young St. Suite B). Regarding his contribution and involvement Geronimo says that Asinabka “gives us an opportunity to show and see contemporary original art works in a context that goes beyond inter-national boundaries. I am grateful and honoured to exhibit my work with video and images, and – with the Festival – help push the boundaries of what indigenous and Inuit media and art can be today.” 

A little bit about the show:

How do you feel? Have you listened to your instinct today? What is your gut telling you? All the combined fields of natural and social sciences have elucidated great intellectual theories as to the nature and function of what we do and the reasons and functionality behind it. To Geronimo Inutiq, the process of artistic expression is an alternative language to all that. Guided by some sort of arbitrary intuition and abstract sense of aesthetics, he produces cultural artefacts that have been shown in galleries and museums in the context of contemporary indigenous and Inuit art exhibits and performance – both nationally and internationally. read more…

“Cowboys N’ Indians” by Alison Bremner in “Neon NDN.” Image provided by Asinabka. 

“Urban Inuk” Jocelyn Piirainen is an “emerging curator with a growing interest in indigenous contemporary art. Her entry into the curatorial world began in with the first ever Indigenous Curatorial Incubator program, where she put together the “UnMENtionables” screening program and helped coordinate the “Memories of the Future” exhibition for the 2015 Asinabka Film and Media Arts Festival.”  This year Jocelyn returns to Asinabka to curate Neon NDN: Indigenous Pop-Art Exhibition at SAW Gallery (Arts Court Building, 67 Nicolas St.).

From her curatorial statement:

In an article titled “Is There an Indigenous Way to Write about Indigenous Art?”, Richard William Hill recently contemplated “in purely practical terms, how would you bracket off Indigenous culture? Where do you draw the line? No more pop culture?”Had certain Indigenous artists bracketed off pop culture, Neon NDN would have been something quite different. In this Information Age, pop culture is everywhere and it’s not surprising many contemporary Indigenous artists engage with popular characters from film, television, video games, comic books, even corporate symbols and brand names. Through interacting with, reclaiming, and repurposing popular culture, Indigenous artists challenge a number of stereotypes and Hollywood tropes that have been set against Indigenous people and culture. read more…

Jocelyn states that “for this show, I really just wanted to create a sense of fun and bring in lots of colour. The theme is pop art – and for Indigenous artists, this theme isn’t quite so new as one might think.”

Both shows open on Saturday, August 13 and their will be Gallery Crawl with a FREE Shuttle bus provided. The bus will leave SAW Gallery after the 3 pm screening (OKA Legacy) wraps up. The bus will leave Gallery 101 to head back to SAW after the opening of Geronimo’s show that also includes a FREE BBQ. Neon NDN‘s vernissage will begin at 7:30 pm. Stay for the Music Night that will start at 9 pm.

From the Opening Night at Victoria Island to the closing party at Kinki Lounge (41 York St. in the Byward Market) you can find the best in contemporary Indigenous film, media and visual arts at multiple venues across the city from Wednesday, August 10 to Sunday, August 14, 2016.

For the full schedule click here.

Follow on Facebook & twitter @asinabkafest.

Images by Leah Snyder for Mixed Bag Mag unless otherwise noted. 

WEEKEND FILM FESTS: The Toronto Palestinian Film Festival & Ottawa’s One World Film Festival

One World Film Festival opens at the Library & Archives this weekend in Ottawa. 

This weekend whether you are in the Capital of Ontario or the Capital of Canada, both cities are hosting independent film festivals with programming that offers critique to current issues, like Oil and Occupation as well as Occupation because of Oil.

In Ottawa the One World Film Festival is in it’s 25th year. It runs from Thursday September 25th to Saturday, September 27th.

THURSDAY: Above All Else @ 6:30 pm

(Includes Panel Discussion with filmmakers John Fiege and Anita Grabowski and Ben Powless of Ecology Ottawa after screening)

“an intimate portrait of a group of landowners and activists in East Texas who tried to stop construction of the Keystone XL pipeline, a $7 billion dollar project slated to carry tar sands oil from Canada to refineries on the Texas Gulf Coast. They risk financial ruin, personal safety, and the security of their families as they attempt to protect their land and defend their rights. The film is both an exploration of the human spirit and a window into how social change happens in America.” More info…

FRIDAY: Virunga @ 6:30 pm (Includes Panel Discussion after the screening)

“Africa’s oldest national park, Virunga is a UNESCO world heritage site, and the last natural habitat for the endangered mountain gorilla. None of that will stop the business interests and rebel insurgencies lurking at the park’s doorstep. Orlando von Einsiedel pairs gorgeous natural scenes from Virunga with riveting footage of the Congolese crisis, raising an ardent call for conservation as a vital human enterprise. Along the way, he spotlights the incredibly dangerous work that is often required to safeguard the environment.” More info…

SATURDAY: Watchers of the Sky @ 6:00 pm & On The Side of the Road @ 8:45 pm

WATCHERS OF THE SKY interweaves four stories of remarkable courage, compassion, and determination, while setting out to uncover the forgotten life of Raphael Lemkin – the man who created the word “genocide,” and believed the law could protect the world from mass atrocities. Inspired by Samantha Power’s Pulitzer Prize-winning book, A Problem From Hell, WATCHERS OF THE SKY takes you on a provocative journey from Nuremberg to The Hague, from Bosnia to Darfur, from criminality to justice, and from apathy to action.” More info…

&

“Former West Bank settler Lia Tarachansky looks at Israelis’ collective amnesia of the fateful events of 1948 when the state of Israel was born and most of the Palestinians became refugees. She follows the transformation of Israeli veterans trying uncover their denial of the war that changed the region forever. Tarachansky then turns the camera on herself and travels back to her settlement where that historical erasure gave birth to a new generation, blind and isolated from its surroundings. Attempting to shed a light on the country’s biggest taboo, she is met with outrage and violence.” More info…

Full schedule on One World Film Festival’s website.

All screenings take place at the Library & Archives, Library and Archives Canada, 395 Wellington Street, Ottawa. View map.

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The Toronto Palestinian Film Festival opens this Saturday in Toronto. 

The Toronto Palestinian Film Festival (TPFF) runs from Saturday, September 27th to Friday, October 3rd (so in theory, you could attend both!)

Sunday includes a screening of Omar, one of my favourite movies of 2013. Along with dramas and shorts by Palestinian filmmakers, the festival also includes films about Palestine from the perspective of non-Palestinians. One example is Village Under the Forest.

“The Village Under the Forest explores the hidden remains of the destroyed Palestinian village of Lubya, which lies under South Africa Forest. During the 1948 Nabka, more than 500 Palestinian villages were destroyed. The Jewish National Fund raised money from around the world under the guise of ‘greening the desert’ and built forests and parks named after different countries on the remains of these villages in an attempt to erase their dark history. Writer/narrator Heidi Grunebaum revisits South Africa Forest, the forest she helped finance with the pennies she collected as a child twenty year ago. Using the forest and the ruins of Lubya as representative of a much wider process, this compelling film explores central themes of the Nakba – forced exile, erasure of memory, creating ‘facts on the ground’, and the Palestinian Right of Return.” More info…

“Making its debut at TIFF 2013, Giraffada is a light-hearted drama inspired by a true story. Ziad, a ten-year-old boy from the West Bank, spends all his free time at the Qalqilya zoo where his father Yacine (Saleh Bakri) works as the zoo’s veterinarian. In particular, Ziad has a special bond with the zoo’s two giraffes who he helps care for. Yacine, recently widowed, is determined to preserve the zoo as a haven for animals and for the local children who play there, temporarily escaping the hardships under occupation. One night, after an air strike on the city, one of Ziad’s beloved giraffes dies. The surviving giraffe stops eating due to the loss of her mate. Yacine is determined to save her by bringing in a new giraffe but the only zoo that can help him is in Tel Aviv. Yacine and Ziad are committed to doing whatever it takes to save their giraffe, even if it means breaking the law. Giraffada, which stars Mohammad Bakri (In Attendance), is a unique portrayal of childhood under occupation.”

Last week at Beit Zatoun TPFF hosted a talk on New Directions in Indigenous Cinema with Jesse Wente (Director of Film Programmes & curator of TIFF’s 2012 program First Peoples Cinema: 1500 Nations, One Tradition) and Rasha Salti (TIFF Programmer for African and Middle Eastern Cinema). Rasha discussed the historical and contemporary context of Palestinian cinema. There is a lot to be learned! The documentary Cinema Palestine offers more insight.

“Cinema Palestine is a poetic documentary which explores the life and work of multiple generations of Palestinian filmmakers and media artists. Based on in-depth interviews with a wide range of Palestinian artists living in the Middle East, as well as North American and Europe, the film documents the emergence of a Palestinian narrative through film, the relevance of film to the Palestinian national struggle and the relationship between art, personal experience and politics in one of the most contested landscapes in the world. The film features interviews with numerous filmmakers screened at TPFF including: Annemarie Jacir, Rashid Masharawi, Mohammad Bakri, Najwa Najjar, Hany Abu-Asad, Nasri Hajjaj and Mai Masri. A post-Screening Panel featuring Tim Schwab, Mohammad Bakri and Mais Darwazah will follow the film, with our guests further exploring the role of Palestinian cinema in the emergence of the Palestinian narrative.”

Screenings for the TPFF take place at TIFF and the AGO’s Jackman Hall. For full schedule details click here.

Also find TPFF info on Facebook and Twitter.

 

WEEKEND PLANS: What’s Happening in Toronto & Ottawa

Advertisement for Cinefranco Film Festival

Non-stop events in Ottawa as well as Cinefranco and the One of a Kind Show in Toronto signal spring is coming!

Ottawa is certainly giving Toronto a run for its money in the event department. On any given day my schedule fills up with one, plus two, then three events! I have yet to find a way to be in two places at once so when my body is Ottawa my spirit is still hovering around in Toronto and when I am in Toronto my spirit hovers here. This weekend (physically at least) it’s Ottawa for me but if you are in Toronto then check out Cinéfranco. This amazing Francophone Film Festival is now in its 17th year! Opening today, Cinéfranco’s programming runs through until next Sunday night – a full 10 days of diverse programming and the best of French cinema!

Logo that says Thunderbird Marketplace

Also the One of a Kind Show is now underway and new this year is The Thunderbird Marketplace.

“The Thunderbird Marketplace features 12 Aboriginal creators chosen to showcase their unique, original designs at the 2014 One of a Kind Spring Show.  Representing a diversity of Aboriginal nations, their individual work is inspired from deep cultural roots expressed in contemporary artistic forms.  The 12 Creators present exceptional designs including visual art, textile, beading, corn husk work, leather work, jewellery, porcupine quill work, basketry, accessories and clothing design.”

Tonight, in a mere few hours, Spacing Magazine launches their Spring 2014 Issue along with the Jane Jacobs Prize Ceremony. If you are into city building and the New Urbanism movement this is your event! More details here…

Cover a magazine that says Spacing and has bike on front

And if you are into dance instead then Saturday night at Koerner Hall you can witness one of Flamenco’s great masters Israel Galván. I missed him in Ottawa (that 2-places-at-1-time problem!) and now I will be missing him in Toronto but it is sure to be a stunning performance.

Now back to Ottawa…

Cover of book with Min Fami in English and Arabic

Tonight at Octopus Books (251 Bank Street location) is Min Fami: Arab Feminist Reflections on Identity, Space & Resistance.

This event, supported by Students Against Israeli Apartheid Carlton U, is a panel discussion with some of the editors and contributors to this book – Ghadeer Malek (Authour & Editor), Ghaida Moussa (Authour & Editor), Yafa Jarrar (Authour) and Maha Zimmo (Authour).


…tomorrow it’s going to be one of those marathon event days!

Poster for Latin American Film Festival in Ottawa

EVENT #1:
¡FIESTA LATINA! ( 1:00 – 7:00 at the Library and Archives FREE)

The Canadian Film Institute’s Latin Film Festival (March 27 – April 13) is hosting a day long event at the Library & Archives (395 Wellington Street). There will be film, food, dance, and more! For the full schedule visit the Latin Film Festival Facebook Page and the CFC website.

Poster for Niigaan Youth Event

EVENT #2:
Niigaan’s Oshkadis Chineekaneech (5:30 – 8:30 at Carleton University $15)

“Niigaan means leader or future in Anishinabemowin. In keeping with that spirit, we are proud to have our next In Conversation event about young people. Oshkadis Chineekaneech means that the youth will lead/are leading. This talk show style event will have our expert guests discuss what we can do today to make sure the next generation is set up for success.”

And speaking of youth who lead, local talent, hoop dancer Theland Kicknosway will be performing. More information on the Facebook Event Page.

Poster for Art Battle Ottawa with the back of a young man painting an image on an easel

EVENT #3:
Art Battle 111 (7:00 – 10:30 at Arts Court $15 | $10 Students)

“WHAT IS ART BATTLE? Art Battle is live competitive painting. Painters create the best work they can in 20 minutes. As they work, patrons move around the easels, closely watching the creative process. The medium is acrylic paint and the tools allowed are brushes, palette knives or any non-mechanical implements. At the end of the round, the audience votes democratically for their favourite painting and bids in silent auction to take the work home. This is Art Battle Canada’s 5th season and first full season in Ottawa.”

Join the event on their Facebook Page or find out more info on the Art Battle Website.

EVENT #4:
GuerillaLIVE 10th Anniversary (10:00 pm – Late @ Gallery 101’s New Location! $10 cover)


“To cap off the GuerllaCRAWL and mark Guerilla’s first decade (2004 to 2014), we are joining forces with Gallery 101 to launch our special 10-year print edition (co-published by CHUO 89.1 FM) and let our hair down with a night of live music, performance, and celebration.”

More info the Facebook Event Page.

Alright, let the weekend begin!

THIS WEEK IN TORONTO: Reel Artist Film Fest, The State of Blackness, The Artist Project & Building Black

Drawing of a black woman's torso and heart like a anatomical drawing superimposed on itStill We Rise by Rema Tavares, panelist at The State of Blackness Conference.

The body, the face, a space – artists’ ability to mirror who we are & who we can be.

This week in Toronto incredible talent will be gathering to celebrate but also critique.

Colourful painting of a man's torso in a suit jacket
The Introduction #8 by Samara Shuter, The Artist Project Toronto.

Black outline of the backside of a woman lying down filled in with geometric patternsAfro-priation by Rema Tavares, panelist at The State of Blackness Conference.

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REEL ARTIST FILM FESTIVAL

Logo for Reel Artist Film Festival Tonight Canadian Art’s amazing documentary film fest, RAFF (Reel Artist Film Fest) launches. Under the direction of the former Executive Director of Canadian Art, Ann Webb, RAFF became the sweet spot in the year for incredible inspiration. The Opening Night has become a big art star event with this year’s guest of honour Kehinde Wiley in attendance. Known for his vibrant portraits of black men that reference the portraiture work of Renaissance painters, Kehinde has (with some trepidation)  moved on to paint women. An Economy of Grace is the documentary that follows Kehinde as he searches for the women who will become his new muses.

RAFF will also be screening two of Art21’s New York Close Up shorts this year. The first is by LaToya Ruby Frazier, one of the artists short-listed for last year’s AIMIA AGO Photography Prize.

“Her work interrogates how the toxic postindustrial geography of Braddock, Pennsylvania has shaped multiple generations of her family, acting as a mirror for the complex social problems that beset America today.” Read more…

The second short is Rashid Johnson Makes Things to Put Things On.

“In this film, Rashid Johnson discusses the fluid nature of black identity in America and its escapist tendencies, from the Afrocentric politics of Marcus Garvey to the cosmic philosophy of Sun Ra.” Read more…

Portrait of a mirror image of a black man with dreads and suit jacket
Portrait of Rashid Johnson from RAFF website.

Painting of young white girl lying down and tracing the lines of a damask pattern
Vivid Blue by Eric Robitaille, The Artist Project Toronto.

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THE ARTIST PROJECT TORONTO

The Artist Project Toronto LogoAnother great art party happens Thursday night with the Opening Soirée for The Artist Project Toronto. Running until Sunday The Artist Project offers three full days to experience beautiful work.

Eric Robitaille’s pieces show his talent as a graphic designer with stories emerging from the many colour washes and textural layers of his work. “During the last few years, the development of several new techniques has allowed for a more spontaneous and raw style, balanced throughout with meticulous detail.” Read more…

Colourful painting of a man's torso in a suit jacketThe Introduction #5 & #11 by Samara Shuter, The Artist Project Toronto.

Artist Samara Shuter paints crayola coloured canvases of men in suits because the suit “has represented something for decades; power, productivity, strength, economic prosperity, and hard work.” Read more…

upclose photograph of towers like city skyscrapers made of colourful lego
Lego City Tower on Hill Elevation by Laird Kay, The Artist Project Toronto.

Laird Kay has studied planning and design so it’s not surprising his photography reaches back to the concepts of city planning via the playful medium of lego as the building blocks.

“Lego City Elevation, Is it Dubai? Is it Hong Kong? New York? Singapore? Toronto? Vancouver? Or all of the above? Cities used to be the result of collective will and a desire to shape – to control – our environments. They were expressions of the things that happened in them. Now they’re about branding and image. Like plastic, like LEGO City, they’re no longer built to last – they can be pulled down when fashions change. LEGO City expresses the modern absence of community in city-shaping. Although stylized, these photographs of LEGO City show us how the line between plastic and uninhabited has become virtually indistinguishable from the “real thing”.” See more…

Image of 3 white styrofoam cups on white background
Tears in the Ice Box by Noah Gano, The Artist Project Toronto.

The technicolour spectrum contained in Laird’s work on how places start to eclipse our human essence with their artificiality is in sharp contrast to the minimalist whiteness of Noah Gano who also makes use of materials the are divorced from the natural. “Navigating through themes of experience and identity, he works conceptually in photography, sculpture, and collage.” See more…

There is much to see at The Artist Project and much to buy with all artists exhibiting work that is for sale and ready to find a new home. Plan on making a purchase!

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Logo for The State of Blackness ConferenceAlso on Thursday The State of Blackness Conference begins.

“This conference consists of both closed working sessions and public events. The conference opens with one and a half days of closed working sessions designed to provide opportunities for artists, educators, curators, scholars, and cultural workers to engage in intensive and critical collaborative discussions about the current state of blackness and the challenges and strategies employed to increase visibility. Emphasis will be placed on developing networks of engagement and knowledge exchange while developing methodologies and practices that inform the future of black Canadian artistic production and teaching.”

Labeeb by Abdi Osman, panelist at The State of Blackness Conference

One of the panelists is Abdi Osman a “Somali-Canadian photographer whose work focuses on questions of black masculinity as it intersects with Muslim and queer identities.”

Also included on the public panel at Harbourfront Centre (Saturday 2 pm), are the artists Rema Tavares (work seen above), Olivia McGilchrist (work seen below) and Erika DeFreitas.


Discover Me…Series 1 & 2 by Abdi Osman, panelist at The State of Blackness Conference

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Heidi McKenzie, Curator of ‘Face Value’ from Heidi McKenzie on Vimeo.

Logo for Face Value Show

“What you see isn’t necessarily who you are”

Corresponding with the conference is the exhibit Face Value by curator / artist Heidi McKenzie.

“The way people look, and the way they are looked at, has a profound effect on the person being seen. For the bi-racial or mixed-race person, the simple act of being seen by others can be fraught with tension and ambiguity. The familiar unconscious act of identifying and categorizing a person’s race based on their face value slips beyond the concrete into the murkiness of the grey zone.”

Olivia McGilchrist Artist Statement from Heidi McKenzie on Vimeo.

(whitey) Discovery Bay by Olivia McGilchrist, panelist at The State of Blackness Conference 


Image by Leah Snyder for Mixed Bag Mag.

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Building Black at Daniels Spectrum

Another artist using Lego in his work is Ekow Nimako who uses the toy blocks to produce pieces that are about the less-than-playful issues around identity and racial narratives.

For the month of February his work in the show Building Black is part of Daniels Spectrum’s programming around Black History Month. On the main floor of the Arts Centre, Ekow’s work greets you at the side entrance and lines the hallway outside the theatre spaces. His masks reflect the cultural legacy Ekow inherited from his parents who immigrated to Canada from Ghana. They are each infused with their own personality and speak of the strength and tenacity of culture.

His other figures have darker stories which Ekow, also a writer, provides. Mounted on the walls is the poetry he has written for each piece. A golliwog sits less than comfortably, performing a stiff smile that would make Paula Deen feel nostalgic. The life sized figure of a child dressed like a flower girl is exhausting in its detail but also in the back story. Ekow was researching slave narratives and considering the lost girls who would never be granted the innocence of childhood dreams.

Flower Girl Requiem

Forever innocent they say,
Free from taint or world decay,
Pretty basket filled with blooms
Plucked from the earth none too soon.

Love she for all her hope and youth,
Her pretty gown, the purest truth
Her basket and the whites within,
The blooms of cotton, soft and grim.

The world can never seem so stark,
So bright, so safe, so cold and dark
As when gazed upon through childhood’s eyes,
For which my precious dare not oblige.

Alas, her aisle will not be strewn,
For she who’s ever loved is gone
The child of flowers, picked and praised
Forever innocent, they say.

Recent spread in Grid Magazine on Ekow installing his show.

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As part of the Building Black show Ekow will be giving an artist talk Talking Black this Sunday 3 – 6 pm at Daniels Spectrum, Regent Park.

More details and schedules for the events can be found on the websites listed below:

Reel Artist Film Festival (Wednesday – Sunday, Opening Party Tonight)

The Artist Project Toronto (Thursday – Sunday, Opening Party Thursday Night @ Better Living Centre, Exhibition Place)

The State of Blackness Conference (Open to the Public on Saturday @ the Harbourfront Centre)

Face Value (Thursday – March 2nd, Opening Reception Thursday Night @ Gallery 1313)

Daniels Spectrum Black History Month Shows (on now for the remainder of the month)

A MUST SEE: Rhymes for Young Ghouls Opening Today in Toronto @ Cineplex

As more information comes to light about the past as well as the present impact of the Residential School System on First Nations, Métis and Inuit people in Canada more ways of telling the story will manifest.

This year Toronto’s amazing Indigenous film festival ImagineNATIVE screened two important films – Empire of Dirt and Rhymes for Young Ghouls –  that although speaking to the same issues, such as intergenerational violence, stylistically differ. This makes for a deeper reach as each film has the potential to draw upon an alternate audience.

Mi’kmaq filmmaker Jeff Barnaby’s Rhymes for Young Ghouls is sleek but not without some grit. The soundtrack of obscure Blues tracks adds even more sexiness. I wondered if I would find this distracting from the character development and the weight of the subject matter. In the end I felt this movie fleshed out the varying perspectives that films like Empire of Dirt and docs on the program of assimilation of Canada’s First Peoples bring to the table. The heroine, Aila, is stunningly played by Mohawk actress Kawennáhere Devery Jacobs who roots the movie with her intensity. It is through her coming-of-age eyes we see the horror that is hard to breathe through but we also see the possibility of magic and hope expressed in her ability not to give up on the wonder of life.

During a Q & A with Jeff Burnaby after RFYG’s screening as part of TIFF Top 10 of Canadian Films a comment was made by a woman in the audience who had grown up on a reserve. She appreciated that despite the painful realities Jeff didn’t shy away from including humour in the film. She expressed that often that side is missing, that the portrayal of First Nations people doesn’t include showing anyone as having a sense of humour. Mi’kmaq actor Glen Gould, Aila’s father in the film, answered by saying that it is humour that has allowed Aboriginal people to live on despite hundreds of years of attempted genocide. Jeff replies that “humour is an important part of surviving through this as Aboriginal people” and because documentaries miss this element it was with intent that he made sure to add comic relief.

Jeff wrapped up his Q & A by stating that “it is up to all of us now, not just Native people, to carry the the torch.”

Hopefully with such films like Rhymes for Young Ghouls non-Indigenous Canadians will be inspired to share in the grace as well as the humour of their Indigenous brothers and sisters and work towards lightening the burden of the past as we all move forward into the future.

Rhymes for Young Ghouls re-opens today in Toronto at the Cineplex at Yonge and Dundas and plays throughout the weekend into next week.

Toronto screening times Today: 1:50pm, 4:05, 6:20 and 8:35.

Following the 8:35 screening there will be a Q&A hosted by First Weekend Club and conducted by Anna Hardwick, followed by a casual cocktail/meet/greet at the Imperial Pub (54 Dundas St. E) with writer/director Jeff Barnaby, producer John Christou and actors Glen Gould, Brandon Oakes and Roseanne Supernault.

Read more about director Jeff Barnaby in his interview with NOW Magazine and the Globe & Mail.

And don’t forget to ‘Like’ RFYG’s on Facebook!

THE MIX IN TORONTO THIS WEEK: Ichimaru, Leanne Betasamosake Simpson, Fatoumata Diawara, Jon Blak & Jean-Luc Godard

Black grafitti wall with faces outlined in white Corner of Richmond & John St. Toronto. Image by Leah Snyder for Mixed Bag Mag.

Are we in a new time and place?

In a Ali Baba franchise off Richmond Street in Toronto I sat with two friends eating falafel. It was time for the sunset call to prayer. The voice of an imam sang Bismillah ar-rahman ar-rahim out from the owner’s laptop.

One friend was explaining Métis history to the other friend originally from Paris. Mon ami parisien paused. With a growing look of elation on his face he declared how beautiful this moment was – the Arabic praise to Allah here in Toronto, traditional Anishinaabe territory, on a busy urban street while speaking of the Métis, a word that is rooted in the French for ‘mix’.

It was a beautiful moment that we, in this hyper-hybrid context of Canada in the 21st Century, can easily take for granted. But these conversations are powerful because they are the wards that support us moving forward towards deep and empathetic inclusivity. The power of storytelling!

And what is happening this week in the Toronto culture scene is storytelling from a multiplicity of viewpoints using various artistic mediums.

It’s going to be a great week!

Portrait of Geisha in black and white

From Geisha to Diva: The Kimonos of Ichimaru opens today at the Textile Museum, tomorrow evening is Anishinaabe writer / activist Leanne Betasamosake Simpson launch of “Islands of Decolonial Love”, Saturday Malian singer Fatoumata Diawara will be performing at Koerner Hall and “Home: Photographs of Jon Blak” opens at The Gladstone Hotel. Finally the French connection – the films of Jean-Luc Godard are being featured at TIFF this week until mid-February.

(left image of Geisha Ichimaru provided by the Textile Museum)

 

From Geisha to Diva: The Kimonos of Ichimaru

“The fascinating life of Ichimaru (1906-1997), one of the most famous geishas of the 20th century due to her exceptional singing voice, is told through this collection of her magnificent kimonos and other personal effects. In the 1930s, Ichimaru left geishahood to pursue an illustrious career as a full-time recording artist, but even as a diva, she continued to perform in full geisha regalia.” Read more…

Runs through to May 25, 2014
Hours Daily 11 am – 5 pm
Wednesdays 11 am – 8 pm
$15 General Admission
Pay What You Can Wednesdays from 5 – 8 pm

Woman speaking and holding beaded wampum belt with other panelists
Leanne Simpson speaking on a panel at Niigaan Gala. Image by Leah Snyder for Mixed Bag Mag.

The Catalyst Café featuring Leanne Simpson, Tara Williamson, Sean Conway & Nick Ferrio

“Leanne teamed up with Indigenous musicians including Tara Williamson, Nick Ferrio, Sean Conway, Sarah Decarlo, Melody McKiver, Cris Derksen & A Tribe Called Red, to record writings from her book Islands of Decolonial Love as a spoken word/musical performance.

Renowned writer and activist Leanne Simpson vividly explores the lives of contemporary Indigenous Peoples and communities, especially those of her own Nishnaabeg nation in her debut collection of short stories in Islands of Decolonial Love.” Read more…

Thursday January 30
8-10pm @ The Music Gallery, Toronto’s Centre For Creative Music
197 John St.
Doors Open @ 7pm
$15 | $10 students Purchase Tickets Here

Image of female singer in African and western style outfitFatourmata Diawara performing at Luminato 2012. Image by Leah Snyder for Mixed Bag Mag.

Fatoumata Diawara with Bassekou Kouyate

“Named by TIME magazine in late 2012 as one of the next 10 artists poised for stardom, Malian singer Fatoumata Diawara originally moved to France to study acting, and appeared in several films before picking up the guitar and writing her own songs. “Enchanting and blissful. Her well-crafted songs are often light and breezy, but her soulful voice brings a bluesy depth and potency that can stop you in your tracks.” Read more…

Saturday, February 1
8 pm @ Koerner Hall
Purchase Tickets Here

HOME: Photographs by Jon Blak

“Home presents photographs by Jon Blak that explore Caribbean Canadian history, culture, art and music with a particular focus on youth culture. Toronto-based photographer Jon Blak works as an artist and educational outreach mentor. Much of his work addresses racism, stereotypes, and role-modelling for young people. Blak’s images reflect the changing contemporary cultural milieu in both Jamaica and Canada as he examines issues around class, race and cultural production to celebrate the impact of community. Home will include an interactive installation, and a short documentary film by Matthew Mulholland.” Read more…

Opening Saturday, February 1
10 pm – 1 am @ The Gladstone Hotel
Runs until February 28
12 – 5pm Daily 2nd Floor Gallery

PRESENTED BY WEDGE CURATORIAL WITH THE GLADSTONE HOTEL AS PART OF TD THEN & NOW SERIES 2014

Godard Forever: Part One

“The first part of our massive, two-season Jean-Luc Godard retrospective — spanning the French New Wave master’s “Golden Age” from his epochal debut Breathless to the apocalyptic nightmare of Weekend — comprises perhaps the most innovative, influential and revolutionary body of work in all of cinema.”More info & full schedule…

Runs until February 13 at TIFF Bell Lightbox on King St. W.

MONGREL MEDIA DOES IT AGAIN: Empire of Dirt Opens in Ottawa

Mongrel Media – getting the story straight.

For the last 20 years Mongrel Media has played an important role in broadening the scope of Canadian film. Always beautiful, thought provoking and socially relevant, this year Mongrel Media’s Empire of Dirt premiered at TIFF and ImagineNATIVE. This weekend Empire of Dirt is at Ottawa’s Bytowne Cinema on Rideau Street.

Sunday, Dec 8, 4:15pm
Monday, Dec 9, 9:00pm
Tuesday, Dec 10, 4:30pm

“As in many Native families, Lena Mahikan (Cara Gee) grew up in the cycle of abuse.
Her father, a residential school survivor, was an alcoholic until he killed himself when
Lena was 10. Her mother, only 14 years her senior, turned to the slots and was
consumed. By the time Lena was 15, she was pregnant and, before giving birth, was
kicked to the curb by her mom. For 13 years Lena has been living, poverty stricken in
Toronto, struggling to make ends meet, being chased by her own demons. The
cycle continues and Lena is now watching helplessly as her own daughter, Peeka
(Shay Eyre) spirals out of control, landing herself in the ER following a drug overdose.
As her final attempt at survival, Lena decides to return home and face her own
mother and a past she’s tried desperately to escape. Empire of Dirt tells the story
of three generations of Mahikan women who are given a second chance to be family
and put an end to the painful legacy that has plagued them.”

a post with collage of images of 3 generations of women from the same family with title Empire of Dirt

Follow Empire of Dirt on Facebook & twitter @EODthemovie.

 

 

 

MIXED BAG MAG IN OTTAWA: What’s Happening This Week!

While in Ottawa this summer to cover Sakahàn at the National Gallery I discovered  a lot about this city that I love so I decided I needed to spend more than a weekend and more than a week – why not an entire month?!

Turns out I came at a great time! Despite the dull November sky there are some vibrant events happening this week.

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Chikonzero Chazunguza, “Tigere Muupfu?/Sitting Pretty?”, 2013, at Gallery 101 from Gallery 101 on Vimeo.

WED @ GALLERY 101

Workshop Wednesdays
Fish scale art making with Ottawa based Métis artist Jaime Koebel
6-9pm
$10 open to max of 8 people

Bounty/Abondance
Solo Exhibition by Chikonzero (Chiko) Chazunguza curated by Pamela Edmonds (Third Space Art Projects)

Oct 25 to November 30, 2013

“Bounty is a solo exhibition of recent work by artist Chikonzero (Chiko) Chazunguza exploring his subversive take on the ongoing inequalities of exchange between contemporary Africa and the Western world. This installation brings together a series of paintings, photographic images as well as a performative work that reflects on the artist’s experiences living and working across three continents (Africa, Europe and Canada).”

~Pamela Edmonds

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THURS @ OTTAWA ART GALLERY

“Aboriginal scholar, poet and writer, Armand Garnet Ruffo previews his forthcoming book based on the life and art of Norval Morrisseau! The book combines the mythic world of Ojibway storytelling with evocative realism to tell the amazing story of the artist’s life. The reading will be accompanied by a visual presentation of the artist’s paintings.”

Join Facebook Event Here!

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THURS, FRI & SAT @ CANADA’S NATIONAL ARTS CENTRE

Akram Khan is truly one of the most visionary dancers / choreographers of our time.. Experiencing his work at Luminato 2011 has been one of the highlights of my life!

(TIP – visit his website. The intro is a stunner!)

More info on the event on their NAC’s website. Purchase tickets online here.

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THURS, FRI, SAT & SUN @ GALERIE SAW GALLERY

ART STAR 5

Video Art Biennial / Biennale de vidéo d’art

November 14 – 17, 2013

Galerie SAW Gallery + Club SAW

Single screenings: $5 / Biennial all-access pass: $15

“Now in its fifth edition, the Art Star Video Art Biennial is a unique platform for artists and curators working with moving images to connect and exchange in the national capital. Under the theme of Witness and Testify, Art Star highlights practices rooted in place, intimacy, and broader questions of social movements and collective histories. Over four days, SAW hosts screenings, social events, and masterclasses with video artists from around the planet, and curators culled from our vibrant local milieu. We’re thrilled to be partnering this year with the Media Arts Network of Ontario for their national conference, Evolve or Perish, which will add a special contingent of media artists, programmers, and theorists to the mix. Join us as we celebrate art’s potential to effect social change and challenge our assumptions of the world around us.”

Join Facebook Event Here!\

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THURS ONGOING TO DEC 1 @ LIBRARY & ARCHIVES

The European Film Festival

“World-class, award-winning, and Oscar-submitted films from 27 countries across the European Union!

Special guests welcomed this year include Tahar Rahim, lead actor from the Cannes-selected Grand Central (France), as well as Matthias Drescher, producer of the acclaimed drama Shifting the Blame (Germany).

Other festival evenings will be introduced with exclusive video greetings from filmmakers or actors, and many nights are followed by complimentary Embassy receptions. All of the films shown are Ottawa premieres, presented at the Auditorium of 395 Wellington St., Ottawa (Library and Archives Canada building).”
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FRI @ ABORIGINAL ART CENTRE (GATINEAU)

Artist Talk by Jason Baerg speaking on Aboriginal Expressions: National Capital Commission Confederation Boulevard Banners 2013

Aboriginal Art Centre Aboriginal Affairs, Room 928, 10 Wellington St

11:30 am

View the Gallery of all the banners.

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ALL THIS WEEK @ BYTOWNE CINEMA

Some great films are opening this week at the Bytowne Cinema like Oil Stands Karaoke and A Touch of Sin

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Want to know all about what is happening in both the Canadian and International Culture scene?  Like us on Facebook or follow on Twitter @mixedbagmag!