NAC ANNOUNCES #INDIGENOUS #THEATRE DIRECTOR: #Ottawa welcomes Kevin Loring to the National Arts Centre

Kevin Loring, the NAC’s new Indigenous Theatre Director in Children of God at the NAC. (www.nac-cna.ca)

Last year the National Arts Centre (NAC) in Ottawa announced they would be adding an Indigenous Theatre department to join their already strong English and Théâtre français / French Theatre departments. This decision was announced on “March 24, 2016 when the NAC unveiled details of its Strategic Plan entitled Canada is Our Stage: 2015-2020.”

The NAC, as a national institution, has been a leader in providing programming that serves the diversity of audiences in Canada but they realized they needed to do more.

“When the National Arts Centre first opened in 1969 it reflected the way Canada understood itself at the time, as a bi-cultural and bilingual country,” said Peter A. Herrndorf, the President and CEO of the NAC. “We opened with a French Theatre, English Theatre, Music and Dance Departments. Thankfully that understanding of Canada is changing through the extraordinary work of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and through the work of many artists across the country. We are very pleased to be opening the first Indigenous Theatre in the NAC’s history and we look forward to meeting extraordinary candidates from across Canada who will build the new Indigenous Theatre Department.”

Yesterday the NAC announced the name of the new director – Kevin Loring, Nlaka’pamux from the Lytton First Nation. Kevin is no stranger to the NAC. In 2010 Kevin was the NAC Playwright-in-Residence and this past week and half he has been performing at the NAC as part of the cast of the Children of God, a poignant play about the history of residential schools. I had the opportunity to see the performance last week and Kevin’s performance was riveting.

Kevin was also part of the 2012 NAC production of King Lear in the role of Edmund. Outside of his work with the NAC he is also known for his play Where the Blood Mixes which won the Governor General’s Literary Award for Drama in 2009.

Congratulations to NAC for their announcement and to Kevin for his new position as part of this important initiative!

See Kevin perform in Children of God closing this weekend. Performance times as follows:

FRIDAY 7:30 pm
SATURDAY 2 pm Matinee and 7:30 pm
SUNDAY 2 pm Matinee

For tickets and more information click here

Promotional image for Children of God. (www.nac-cna.ca)

ABOUT CHILDREN OF GOD

From the NAC website: 

Children of God is a gorgeous, powerful musical about an Oji-Cree family whose children were taken away to a residential school in Northern Ontario. The story of Rita, a mother who was never let past the school’s gate, and her kids, Tom and Julia, who never knew she came, pushes toward redemption. Children of God offers a thrilling blend of ancient traditions and contemporary realities, celebrating resilience and the power of the Indigenous cultural spirit. Inspired by First Nations music, Payette’s profoundly moving score also includes echoes of provocative Broadway masterpieces such as Fun Home and Next to Normal.


Audience Advisory:
 Mature themes. Some audience members may find certain scenes disturbing.
Emotional Support Workers are available to provide counseling to audience members who may require it. All are welcome in our support room. Please see an usher for directions.

 

_________________________________________________________________________

National Arts Centre. (2017). The NAC Names First Ever Artistic Director of Indigenous Theatre [Press release].

National Arts Centre. (2016). The NAC Recruits First Artistic Director of Indigenous Theatre [Press release].

MEET THE EXPERTS @ THE NGC THIS SATURDAY: The #curators & #conservators of the National Gallery of #Canada #Ottawa offer public tours

The Curators and Conservators who worked on the new Canadian and Indigenous Galleries speak on their work.

This week the new Canadian and Indigenous Galleries has opened. To celebrate the occasion the NGC is offering tours all day Saturday with the experts who make things happen at the Gallery. All tours are free with admission.

SCHEDULE OF TOURS

10 AM KATERINA ATANASSOVA: Senior Curator, Canadian Art

Room A105 (English with Bilingual Q & A)

Join Katerina Atanassova, Senior Curator, Canadian Art, as she talks about the new installation of works by the Group of Seven and Tom Thomson and provides insight into the artists who shaped the Canadian art landscape in the early 20th century.

11 AM CHRISTINE LALONDE: Associate Curator, Indigenous Art

Room A101 (English with Bilingual Q & A)

Meet Christine Lalonde, Associate Curator, Indigenous Art, as she talks about the Gallery’s new installation of Indigenous art and provides insight into the Indigenous cultures who created the works on view.

12 PM JONATHAN SHAUGHNESSY: Associate Curator, Contemporary Art
Room C218 (English with Bilingual Q & A)

Join artists Damian Moppett and Ron Moppett as they discuss their work and exhibition with Jonathan Shaughnessy, Associate Curator, Contemporary Art.


2:30 PM DORIS COUTURE-RIGERT: Chief, Conservation & Technical Research
Room A102 (English with Bilingual Q & A)

Join Doris Couture-Rigert, Chief, Conservation and Technical Research, as she address the challenges faced in conserving, restoring and displaying works of art in the Canadian and Indigenous Galleries

3:30 PM GENEVIÈVE SAULNIER: Conservator, Contemporary Art
Room B205 (French with Bilingual Q & A)

Join Geneviève Saulnier, Conservator, Contemporary Art, as she address the challenges faced in conserving, restoring and displaying works of art in the Canadian and Indigenous Galleries.

#OTTAWA CLOSING THIS WEEKEND: Last day 4 “Transactions” exhibit #celebrating #Queer #experiences at #Carleton #University #Art #Gallery

Work by Elisha Lim. 

Final day to see Transactions by curator Cara Tierney at CUAG

This amazing show “celebrating queer experiences” closes today after it’s run at the Carleton University Art Gallery (CUAG) in Ottawa. Curator Cara Tierney has created a space that pulsates with jubilation. The artists flesh out what it means to be deeply connected to your community as well as deeply loved by your community. The work in the show positions joy and empathy as resilience. Beautiful portraits of the Queer and allied community are created through visuals, words, and performance. Transactions is a visually stunning show that includes in situ graffiti by Ottawa based artist Kalkidan Assefa that wraps around corners softening the space “as the show unfolds in the visual embrace of this unswerving ally.” This is a not-to-be-missed exhibit!

WHEN: Sunday, February 12 from 1 – 5 pm
WHERE: Carleton University Art Gallery, St. Patrick’s Building, Carleton University,

FEATURED ARTISTS:

“Celebrating queer experiences that emerge from transactional creative exchanges, the artists in TRANSACTIONS define, refine, redefine, exult themselves today for the (a)genders of tomorrow, linking communities and challenging ideas of authenticity, allyship, belonging and being.”

More info on CUAG’s website

Images from top to bottom: Portrait of Kama La Mackerel; graffiti by Kalkidan Assefa with work by Elisha Lim in the background; work by Elisha Lim; more work by Elisha Lim, graffiti by Kalkidan Assefa.

All images by Leah Snyder for Mixed Bag Mag. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

#OTTAWA THIS WEEKEND: Ottawa #Black #Arts Kollective presents “The Stranger Among Us” Vernissage Today 1-3 pm!

OBAK show at Arts Ottawa East!

The Ottawa Black Arts Kollective presents 7 Ottawa-based artists working in various media in the show “The Stranger Among Us.”

WHEN: Vernissage today, Sunday, February 12 from 1-3 pm show runs to March 14
WHERE:  AOE Gallery, Shenkman Arts Centre, 245 Centrum Boulevard, Ottawa, Ontario

Featured Artists:

Below work by artist Ojo Agi from the “Daughters of Diaspora” series.


Images by Leah Snyder for Mixed Bag Mag.

#TORONTO TOMORROW: Fashioning #Reconciliation at #Ryerson University with @rskucheran

Decolonizing and Indigenizing the Fashion Industry.

This panel addresses one of the many places Reconciliation can occur in Canada, even in fashion!

WHEN: Wednesday, February 2 @ 3:10 pm
WHERE: George Vari Engineering & Computing Centre Rm 103, Ryerson University, 245 Church Street, Toronto

FEATURING: 

For the Winter 2017 semester with support from its Aboriginal Education Council, the School of Fashion at Ryerson University developed Aboriginal curricula for its mandatory first year course FSN 223: Fashion Concepts and Theory, instructed by Dr. Ben Barry, Associate Professor of Equity, Diversity & Inclusion. A lecture was researched and delivered by Ojibway MA Candidate Riley Kucheran, and a panel event featured Angela DeMontigny, Métis Fashion Designer; Sage Paul, Setsuné Indigenous Fashion Incubator; and J’net Ayayqwayaksheelth, Nuu-chah-nulth Textile Artist, Cedar Bark Weaver, and Indigenous Outreach and Learning Coordinator at the ROM. ‘Fashioning Reconciliation’ is a conversation about Truth & Reconciliation, Cultural Appropriation and Indigenizing the Fashion Industry.

Synaptic City Collection (2012) from Sage Paul website

 

OTTAWA DEMAIN: #WMWCanada 4 #WomensMarchOnWashington @ #HumanRights #Monument #Ottawa City Hall @ 11 am

Tweet #WMWCanada #WomensMarch & #WomensMarchOnWashington 2
@CdnWomenMarch @womensmarch

FACEBOOK: 

Manif Solidaire de la Marche des Femmes à Washington DC. La rencontre d’Ottawa est une de plusieurs événements ayant lieu au pays et sert aussi de lieu officiel de regroupement au Canada.

Parcours: Débute au Monument aux Droits de la personne, se poursuivra via Laurier pour se conclure àu Bronson Centre où auront lieu des présentations à l’intérieur.

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Le 21 janvier 2017, nous marcherons.

Nous marcherons en solidarité avec les centaines de milliers de femmes à Washington alors qu’elles investiront la rue de leurs buts communs et de leurs voix distinctes.

Nous exprimerons notre solidarité envers celles et ceux faisant partie de rassemblements semblables partout au Canada et dans le monde pour soutenir les droits des femmes en tant que partie intégrante du respect des droits de la personne. Nous nous unissons contre les paroles, les attitudes et les actions qui causent des clivages telles que nous avons observé au cours des événements de l’année dernière.

Nous affirmerons haut et fort notre soutien envers les droits des femmes de tous horizons.

**ESPRIT DE LA MARCHE & CONSIDÉRATIONS ÉTHIQUES**
Cette marche non-violente, inclusive et intersectionnelle a pour objectif de manifester en faveur des droits des femmes – toutes les femmes – peu importe leur appartenance ethnique, leur croyances religieuses, leur affiliations politiques, leur identité de genre cis/trans ou leur orientation sexuelle. La violence, qu’elle soit pour ou contre la droite, la gauche, le centre ou les indépendants, n’est pas la bienvenue et ne sera pas tolérée. Nous sommes résolument engagées envers le féminisme et l’inclusion sociale.

  • Femmes et filles, Personnes transgenres ou au genre fluide
  • Hommes et garçons
  • Familles
  • Minorité visible
  • Immigrants
  • Communauté LGBTQI+
  • Personnes vivant avec un handicap
  • Personnes oeuvrant au sein d’un métier du sexe
  • Toutes les communautés religieuses
  • Défenseurs du changement climatique
  • Toute autre personne voulant offrir son soutien

Cet événement a été mis sur pied suite à l’élection de Trump à la Maison Blanche en réponse aux attitudes, messages et actions discriminatoires, incitant à la haine, qui ont émergé pendant la campagne et qui continuent d’être véhiculés par les discours politiques partout au monde. Nous reconnaissons que même au Canada, il reste beaucoup de chemin à faire. La violence conjugale, l’harcèlement en milieu de travail, le sexisme à l’école et la dénégation des victimes d’agressions sexuelles représentent tous des réalités d’ici qu’il presse toujours de solutionner. Cette marche servira de plateforme où les femmes les plus marginalisées de notre pays pourront s’exprimer et se faire entendre.

À ce jour, aucun pays au monde n’a encore atteint l’égalité entre les sexes, mais cela ne signifie pas que nous devons y renoncer. Nous ne tolérerons aucune discrimination ni aucune victimisation des femmes, ni aucune violation des droits des femmes, que ce soit par des mots, des actions ou des politiques. Nous ne permettrons pas que nos droits durement gagnés soient floués et nous continuerons notre quête d’une égalité intersectionnelle et substantielle!

“Assez égales”, ça ne suffit pas!
Nous espérons que nos frères, pères, fils, maris et autres alliés masculins marcheront à nos côtés — les droits des femmes font partie intégrante des droits de la personne!

Cet événement n’est que le début. Unissons-nous. Soyez solidaires.

MARCHES LOCALES AU CANADA
Groupe canadien qui voyagera vers Washington D.C.
– Vancouver CB
– Vallée-de-l’Okanagan Valley/Kelowna CB
– Nanaimo CB
– Kamloops CB
– Edmonton AB
– Calgary AB
– Winnipeg MB
– Toronto ON
– Ottawa ON
– Montréal QC
– Halifax NÉ 
– Gabriola CB
– Grand Forks CB
– Kingston ON
– Lethbridge AB 
– Happy Valley/Goose Bay/North West River Beach LAB
– Niagara/St.Catharines ON
– St.John’s TN
– London ON
– Hamilton ON
– Île Bowen CB
– Fredericton NB
– Victoria CB
– Whitehorse YT 
– Saskatoon SK
– Kootenay Bay CB @ Yasodhara Ashram
– Saint John NB
– Sutton QC

Coordination américaine des marches locales avec liens par État :http://www.facebook.com/events/2169332969958991/

OTTAWA TOMORROW: “Kanata 150?” critiques #Canada150

Image: Oo Aqpik “Crown for Sedna” 2016. Provided by Studio Sixty Six. 

Countering celebrations of nationalism with alternate narratives. 

Graduating just last year from Carleton University with a Masters in Art History, Rose Ekins has already made her mark on the Ottawa art scene with her ambitious programming at Studio Sixty Six, a commercial gallery located off of Bronson Avenue. Gallery owner Carrie Colton trusted Rose’s vision allowing her the opportunity to consider how a commercial gallery could also play a role in creating a space for art that wasn’t just about saleability but also about provoking tough questions. “I was able to carve out a mandate for myself” and that mandate includes diversity not only in the media that artists work in but more importantly cultural diversity and the stories that get communicated through the work. 

In an effort to offer a counter-narrative to the stories of nationalism that will be getting lots of air time in the 2017 celebrations of Canada’s Sesquicentennial, Rose has curated KANATA 150? a show that questions what the celebrations are about and who the celebrations are for. Featuring predominantly Ottawa based artists, KANATA 150? is “a nod to the origin of the country’s name,” and “presents seven emerging Indigenous artists reflecting on the nature of “Canada 150”.”

Image: Barry Pottle “Creeping South.” Provided by Studio Sixty Six

One of these artists is Barry Pottle, whose work documenting the Urban Inuit experience has previously been featured on Mixed Bag Mag. Also, the work of fellow Inuk, artist Oo Aqpik, will be presented in this show that roots Studio Sixty Six’s 2017 provocative programming that will include emerging artists Florence Yee (Menu of Exoticism) and Kosi Nnebe (Coloured Conversations) later on in the year. Originally from Nunavut, Oo is “well known for her roles in the Inuit language programs in television, radio and recently a feature film documentary, Arctic Defenders.” Like Oo, the artists of KANATA 150 are working in the capacity of activists and ambassadors of culture. Their work is about communicating to Canadians that it is a great risk if Indigenous perspectives, on where this country is headed, are not moved to the centre of all national debates. 

KANATA 150? opens tomorrow evening and promises to be an engaging way to start a critical year in Canada’s history. ARTISTS:

WHEN: Thursday, January 12 @ 6 – 9 pm
WHERE: Studio Sixty Six, 202-66 Muriel Street, K1S4E1

Free – Bar & Food
Physically accessible building
This event is taking place on the unceded territory of the Algonquin Anishinabeg Nation

“The City of Ottawa and Government of Canada are celebrating the 150th anniversary of the Dominion of Canada with events, promotions, and other ambitious goals to increase Canadian pride and patriotism. These festivities are promoting both the history and future of the nation state confederated in 1867. Canada is a country built from settler colonialism, which leaves the question of how the Indigenous peoples of this land are meant to participate in these celebrations. KANATA 150? (January 12 – February 18), a nod to the origin of the country’s name, presents seven emerging Indigenous artists reflecting on the nature of “Canada 150”.”

More info on the Facebook Event Page.

Follow Studio Sixty Six on Facebook, twitter and Instagram.

Image: Krystle Retieffe “Through the Looking Glass – 150 Years” 2016. Provided by Studio Sixty Six

WORLD PREMIERE: “Life Reflected” at the National Arts Centre Ottawa

More important and inspiring programming by the NAC

This winter, as part of  the National Arts Centre’s programming for Art and ReconciliationI Lost My Talk premiered. This incredible and poignant performance included the beautiful choreography of Kaha:wi Dance Theatre‘s Santee Smith and stunning visual design by Montreal’s Normal. Tomorrow evening I Lost My Talk will be part of three other orchestral works premiering as part of Life Reflected. The National Art Centre Orchestra’s Director Alexander Shelley “brought together four remarkable Canadian composers to collaborate with Donna Feore to create an immersive symphonic experience celebrating youth, promise and courage, revealed in the compelling and diverse portraits of four women.”

Tomorrow’s performance will include:

ALICE MUNRO – Dear Life with music composed by Zosha Di Castri
“Dear Life” by Alice Munro, is a reflection on memory, childhood and the formative stages of life. The NAC Orchestra’s Dear Life was composed by Zosha Di Castri.”

AMANDA TODD – My Name is Amanda Todd with music composed by Jocelyn Morlock
My Name is Amanda Todd tells the story of a vibrant 15-year-old who, after suffering for years from cyber abuse, spoke out against harassment and bullying on YouTube. Music composed for the NAC Orchestra by Jocelyn Morlock. 

ROBERTA BONDAR – Bondarsphere with music composed by Nicole Lizée
Dr. Roberta Bondar’s remarkable expertise as an astronaut, physician, scientific researcher, and photographer have been interpreted in Bondarsphere by Nicole Lizée for the NAC Orchestra through soundtrack and video.

RITA JOE – I Lost My Talk with music composed by John Estacio
“I Lost My Talk” – by Mi’kmaw elder and poet Rita Joe, C.M. expresses her experience at Residential School. The NAC Orchestra’s I Lost My Talk was composed by John Estacio.

Read more about Life Reflected & purchase tickets available here.

Image from National Art Centre website

“NOT MY HERITAGE”: Conversations on New Identities / Voices in Conservation hosted by Carleton University

Saturday, April 23 Carleton University will convene conversations on conservation

Last year I attended an engaging symposium on heritage conservation put on by Carleton University Students. Last year’s theme was Unsettling Heritage. This year the conversation will be focused on New Identities / Voices in Conservation and will pose the questions:

  • Whose heritage are we conserving?
  • Whose heritage is being unrepresented or underrepresented in the heritage conservation discourse of the 21st century?

“This theme aims to critically address missing identities and voices in the heritage field and/or highlight alternative stories and perspectives in heritage conservation.”

“In recent years, the identification and conservation of cultural heritage resources—the built environment, cultural landscapes, or intangible heritage—by heritage professionals, has needed to expand and broaden its understanding of community histories to address the plurality and the multi-narratives that exist in our communities. Events such as: the release of the Final Report on Residential Schools by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, the Occupy movement, the protests for gender equality rights, the push for youth engagement in civic duties (voting), and the global issue of refugees and immigration, have recently highlighted some of these ignored or unknown identities and voices that exist, and which have been underrepresented or unrepresented in the field of heritage conservation.” Read more…

Online registration closes tomorrow at noon. Tickets will also be available at the venue door Mill Street Brewery, 555 Wellington Street, Ottawa.

View Full Schedule Here

WHERE: Mill Street Brewery, 555 Wellington Street
WHEN: Saturday, April 23 from 9:00 am to 4 pm
COST: $15 Students / $45 General Admission (Online Registration) $20 Students / $50 General Admission (At the Door)

THIS WEEK IN OTTAWA & TORONTO: #BlackHistoryMonth ends but the contemporary influence continues

Club SAW hosts Black History Month Doc & Talk in partnership with One World Film Festival. 

WHAT: Screening of Invisible City
WHERE: Club SAW at 67 Nicholas Street, Ottawa
WHEN: Thursday, February 25 at 7 pm
COST: Suggested donation is $5 for the general public & $4 for One World Arts members. **Seating is limited**

One World Arts and the One World Film Festival are marking Black History Month with a screening of the award-winning documentary INVISIBLE CITY and a post-film talk with Saide Sayah  (Program Manager for the Affordable Housing Unit at the City of Ottawa) and Chelby Daigle (Community activist and long-term resident of social housing).

The evening will also feature a new Heritage Minute about Canadian civil rights icon Viola Desmond, a Nova Scotian woman who challenged racial segregation and is often referred to as “Canada’s Rosa Parks,” courtesy of Historica Canada.

INVISIBLE CITY follows the lives of two black teens from Toronto’s Regent Park neighbourhood, Kendell and Mikey, as they make the transition from adolescence to adulthood. Their mothers and mentors root for them to succeed as the teens grapple with issues of race, crime and notions of manhood and the social pressures of an environment that places them at risk.

Turning his camera on the often ignored inner city, Oscar-nominated director Hubert Davis sensitively depicts the disconnection of urban poverty and race from the mainstream. INVISIBLE CITY was the winner the Best Canadian Feature award at the 2009 Hot Docs Canadian International Documentary Festival.

Click here to join, like and share this event on Facebook!

More on Invisible City director Hubert Davis on this BlogTO article.

Also, this week INTERGALACTIC NOISE:: A partnership between Black Future Month & the Art Gallery Mississauga 

WHAT: Panel Discussion and Reception
WHERE: Art Gallery of Mississauga
WHEN: Friday, February 26 at 7 – 10 pm

Intergalactic Noise invites a re-engagement with the concept of Black History Month, as artists, designers, and multi-media creatives explore the concept of Afrofuturism. In using the date of 3016, Black Future Month offers an entry point to imagine utopic Black realities beyond the assigned month. Rather than accepting a naïve concept of a future full of advanced technology, the featured artists instead contemplate the possibilities of an advanced humanity.

Exhibiting artists:

  • Sherrae Lyon
  • Quentin VerCetty
  • Danilo McCallum
  • Ekow Nimako

Amanda Parris, host of CBC’s arts & culture programme Exhibitionists moderates a discussion between artists Camille Turner, Ekow Nimako, and Quentin Vercetty.

Join the INTERGALATIC NOISE:: Facebook Event Page for more information

***FREE TRANSPORTATION TO AND FROM THE AGM via BUS! 
BUS PICK-UP LOCATION: GLADSTONE HOTEL (1214 QUEEN ST. W, Toronto) AT 5:30PM.***

upclose shot of black man's hands holding a pink lego mask
Mask by Ekow Nimako. Image by Leah Snyder for Mixed Bag Mag.