#URBANISMLAB #OTTAWA: #Canadian Identity, #Heritage & the Legacies of the Centennial in 1967

The National Capital Commission hosts talk on heritage conservation and nation building.

If you are in the Ottawa area a great regular event is the Capital Urbanism Lab Lecture Series offered by the National Capital Commission (NCC). The NCC is a Crown Corporation that manages federal lands, and “nationally significant public places” in and around Ottawa playing a role in heritage conservation in the National Capital Region. Their Urbanism Lab gathers to it experts in design, architecture, city building and heritage who rethink and reconsider our approaches to creating communities that work for everyone. Past speaker topics have included Indigenous Place Making and Youth Engagement in City Building. Upcoming lectures in 2018 will be focused on topics such as Canadian Design as a Cultural Export and The Capital and a Healthy 10-Minute Neighbourhood.  Past lectures are all archived on the NCC’s Youtube Channel.

Tonight’s lecture, Heritage, circa 1967, will focus on heritage projects that came into being during Canada’s Centennial year in 1967. That time was a moment of national building much like we see now with the Sesquicentennial and Canada 150. Reflection on nation building moments are critical for understanding how processes can compound the problems instead of inspiring new ways of sharing and co-existing in spaces that are often contested and problematic in how they position dominant culture at the expense of other members of a community. Come on out tonight and participate in conversations around creating better communities.

Heritage, circa 1967: The lessons and legacy of Canada’s centennial in the Capital and beyond

WHEN: Wednesday, October 11, 2017 @ 6:30 – 8:30 pm
WHERE: National Capital Commission, 202-40 Elgin Street, Ottawa, K1P 1C7

This is a free event. More information on the NCC’s website.

THIS WEEK IN OTTAWA & TORONTO: #BlackHistoryMonth ends but the contemporary influence continues

Club SAW hosts Black History Month Doc & Talk in partnership with One World Film Festival. 

WHAT: Screening of Invisible City
WHERE: Club SAW at 67 Nicholas Street, Ottawa
WHEN: Thursday, February 25 at 7 pm
COST: Suggested donation is $5 for the general public & $4 for One World Arts members. **Seating is limited**

One World Arts and the One World Film Festival are marking Black History Month with a screening of the award-winning documentary INVISIBLE CITY and a post-film talk with Saide Sayah  (Program Manager for the Affordable Housing Unit at the City of Ottawa) and Chelby Daigle (Community activist and long-term resident of social housing).

The evening will also feature a new Heritage Minute about Canadian civil rights icon Viola Desmond, a Nova Scotian woman who challenged racial segregation and is often referred to as “Canada’s Rosa Parks,” courtesy of Historica Canada.

INVISIBLE CITY follows the lives of two black teens from Toronto’s Regent Park neighbourhood, Kendell and Mikey, as they make the transition from adolescence to adulthood. Their mothers and mentors root for them to succeed as the teens grapple with issues of race, crime and notions of manhood and the social pressures of an environment that places them at risk.

Turning his camera on the often ignored inner city, Oscar-nominated director Hubert Davis sensitively depicts the disconnection of urban poverty and race from the mainstream. INVISIBLE CITY was the winner the Best Canadian Feature award at the 2009 Hot Docs Canadian International Documentary Festival.

Click here to join, like and share this event on Facebook!

More on Invisible City director Hubert Davis on this BlogTO article.

Also, this week INTERGALACTIC NOISE:: A partnership between Black Future Month & the Art Gallery Mississauga 

WHAT: Panel Discussion and Reception
WHERE: Art Gallery of Mississauga
WHEN: Friday, February 26 at 7 – 10 pm

Intergalactic Noise invites a re-engagement with the concept of Black History Month, as artists, designers, and multi-media creatives explore the concept of Afrofuturism. In using the date of 3016, Black Future Month offers an entry point to imagine utopic Black realities beyond the assigned month. Rather than accepting a naïve concept of a future full of advanced technology, the featured artists instead contemplate the possibilities of an advanced humanity.

Exhibiting artists:

  • Sherrae Lyon
  • Quentin VerCetty
  • Danilo McCallum
  • Ekow Nimako

Amanda Parris, host of CBC’s arts & culture programme Exhibitionists moderates a discussion between artists Camille Turner, Ekow Nimako, and Quentin Vercetty.

Join the INTERGALATIC NOISE:: Facebook Event Page for more information

***FREE TRANSPORTATION TO AND FROM THE AGM via BUS! 
BUS PICK-UP LOCATION: GLADSTONE HOTEL (1214 QUEEN ST. W, Toronto) AT 5:30PM.***

upclose shot of black man's hands holding a pink lego mask
Mask by Ekow Nimako. Image by Leah Snyder for Mixed Bag Mag.

 

WHAT’S IN A NAME: We Are Cities round table sparks discussion on ways to Decolonize & Indigenize Ottawa

Evergreen Cityworks campaign gets Canada talking about city building.

Since April a dialogue on city building has been quickly connecting cities across the nation. The goal, utilizing data collected from round tables hosted in urban centres, is to “build a vision and action plan to make Canadian cities healthy and exciting places to live, work and play.” I got involved because I believe in the power of gathering in small circles. When we come together with a spirit of openness ready to dream about a different kind of future anything becomes possible.

Often the discussion of city building revolves around practical issues like infrastructure and public transportation. My goal, in convening several intimate round table conversations in Ottawa for the #WeAreCities campaign, was to expand the discussion to consider what it means to build cities that offer respectful, safe and celebratory places for everyone.

“Create a big vision for  your city and tell us about it” was one of the exercises each group was given. The round table at Carleton University Art Gallery was stacked with PhD students from Cultural Mediations all working in the space of decolonization / indigenization so naturally the visions encompassed ways to nurture a vibrant Indigenous presence in Ottawa. This city has a large urban Aboriginal community and for many the presence of First Nations, Inuit and Metis leaders gathering in Ottawa to work in law, policy, and culture gives the city a richer  dimension. The round table also included PhD student Kanatase Horn (PhD Candidate in Legal Studies) along with Wahsontiio Cross (PhD Candidate in Cultural Mediations). Their vision was to have Ottawa renamed by the Algonquin people from this area. Here Kanatase reflects further on what that vision could mean.

Change the name change the relationship

“Decolonizing and Indigenizing urban spaces is often met with a certain amount of resistance. In a country that has a difficult time balancing individual rights while simultaneously ‘celebrating’ pluralism, it’s to be expected. The atmosphere is tense to say the least. However, this tension should not prevent us from exploring the possibility of decolonizing urban spaces, since considering Canada’s history of colonization, as well as ongoing settler colonial processes of assimilation and erasure, Canada needs to change. Urban spaces provide fundamental locations for that change.

When Indigenous people move to urban areas from their home communities, they usually face economic and social oppression, racism, and increased exposure to police, as well as the criminal justice system as a whole. Rather than the consequence of individual choices however, such negative experiences should be understood as the result of larger structural realities anchored in settler colonialism. And this is why Decolonizing and Indigenizing the urban space, especially in the Nation’s Capital, is important to support and be a part of if you desire to live in a just society for all.

Simply put, these types of actions can initiate the changes necessary to turn Canada from a settler colonial society into a genuine post-colonial nation. It should not, however, be seen as a project that is inherently political. Instead, it should be seen as a project that takes place at every level of society, where there is room and space for everyone to participate. One example of an action with deep symbolic meaning would be the changing of the name of the city of Ottawa to an Algonquin word chosen by the Algonquin people from the unceded territory that Ottawa is located on. Such an action could initiate the kind of social and cultural changes that would make urban spaces more welcoming spaces for Indigenous people as well as Non-Indigenous people since the act of Decolonizing and Indigenizing does not mean prioritizing Indigenous people over others. These types of actions mean placing priority on relationships with each other and the land.

Decolonizing and Indigenizing urban spaces like Ottawa means recognizing that we exist on the land together – land that is the traditional territory of the Algonquin people. While changing the name would be a symbolic gesture, its potential for social and cultural transformation in the hearts and minds of citizens is huge! It would mean going back and trying to adjust our lives so that it reflects the vision that Indigenous people held when they invited settlers to live on their lands with them. This is not about producing exclusions or apartheid like living conditions. Rather, it means living on the land, even in an urban space, in such a way that our traditional hosts would deem appropriate and respectful to all of those around us.”

Is this even possible?

Name changing may seem like a complicated, seemingly impossible task but my co-facilitator Manjit Basi of Citizens Academy was quick to point that India went through it’s own process of name changing that started early in the pre-colonial era after independence. In 1956 the state of Travancore-Cochin was changed to Kerala and then more recently Bombay to Mumbai (1995), Calcutta to Kolkata (2001) and Mysore to Mysuru (2014) proving it can be done without unravelling a country.

There is no reason that we can’t do the same and the participants of this We Are Cities’ round table have proposed an action that could create a lasting legacy that speaks to reconciliation.

Mixed Bag Mag would like to thank Carleton University Art Gallery for providing the space for us to convene. Thanks to Citizens Academy for co-facilitation support and materials. Thanks to poet Jamaal Jackson (Just Jamaal) for closing our session in one of the most beautiful ways – a poem. (read here)

And finally thanks to all the participants for your thoughtful contributions.

More about We Are Cities at www.wearecities.ca and follow on twitter at #WeAreCities.

Want to host your own round table in your city? Find out how here!

All above images by Leah Snyder for Mixed Bag Mag.

WE ARE CITIES: Mixed Bag Mag partners up with Citizens Academy to host a round table on city building in Ottawa

Leah Snyder of MIXED BAG MAG and Manjit Basi, founder of CITIZENS ACADEMY, are partnering to host a We Are Cities Round Table.

As the Nation’s capital, Ottawa has a unique cultural position and plays a significant role in determining the direction Canada will take on many important issues regarding the environment and human rights. Located on traditional Algonquin territory, the city has an active First Nations, Inuit and Métis community as well as a growing immigrant community; a large Francophone population with the province of Quebec just minutes away adds another element to the cultural milieu. Often labelled as a city of bureaucrats, in reality Ottawa has a thriving arts community that includes not only National institutions but a vibrant independent arts scene.

All of the above makes for an interesting dynamic and fertile ground to create big shifts especially around what deep diversity looks like in an urban context.

We would love your contribution to the conversation on city/community building in Ottawa. Please join us!
WHEN: Tuesday, March 17, 2015 5:30 – 8 pm
WHERE: Carleton University Art Gallery
1125 Colonel By Drive (St. Patricks Building)
For visitor parking information click here.

About We Are Cities:

“With your help we will build a vision and action plan to make Canadian cities healthy and exciting places to live, work and play. The campaign will bring peoples’ ideas together and build on the city-focused initiatives that are already taking place across the country. We Are Cities will help connect existing city-building work in order to strengthen and mobilize our collective efforts to enable the change we need. We Are Cities was launched by a number of organizations that believe that a prosperous future for Canada depends on thriving cities. For cities to succeed, citizens need to take an active role in identifying a path forward to achieve resilience, prosperity and inclusivity.” Find out more on www.wearecities.ca and follow at #WeAreCities.

Thank you to Carleton University Art Gallery for providing the space and also to Citizens Academy for their assistance in hosting this event.