#JUSTICEFORCOLTENBOUSHIE: Info 4 gatherings in #Ottawa, #Toronto & Other #Canadian #cities

Image courtesy: Dylan Miner www.wiisaakodewinini.com

OTTAWA GATHERING FOR COLTEN BOUSHIE
WHEN: Saturday, February 10, 2018 @ noon
WHERE: Parliament Hill


TORONTO GATHERING
WHEN: Saturday, February 10, 2018 @ 1 – 2 pm
WHERE: Nathan Phillips Square, Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street, Toronto

From the FB Event Page:
In honor of the late Colten (Coco) Boushie, we are calling for a day of action to show solidarity and support for the Boushie and Baptiste family. We’ll meet at Nathan Phillips Square to gather and hold a vigil.

Bring signs, candles, drums, and someone you love.

OTHER CITIES: 

From FB Event Page: 

Colten Boushie was a 22-year-old from Red Pheasant Cree Nation in Saskatchewan. In August 2016, Colten was shot and killed on a farm while out for a drive with his friends.

On Feburary 9th, a judge and jury ruled that Gerald Stanley was acquitted of all charges.

In honor of the late Colten (Coco) Boushie, we are calling for a day of action to show solidarity and support for the Boushie and Baptiste family.

Gather wherever you are. Rallies and vigils by location will be posted here as soon as information is available.

GATHERINGS———
SASKATOON, FEB 10: 1pm at Court of Queen’s Bench, (520 Spadina Ave) https://www.facebook.com/events/965391253622025/

REGINA, FEB 10: 11am at Queen’s Bench Courthouse (2425 Victoria Avenue)
https://www.facebook.com/events/985660894918403/

OTTAWA, FEB 10: NOON – vigil on Parliament Hill.

EDMONTON: FEB 10 NOON – Edmonton Police Service (9620-103A Avenue) https://www.facebook.com/events/152886782000579/

EDMONTON: FEB 16: 6 pm – Alberta Legislature Building (10800 97 Ave NW)
https://www.facebook.com/events/1813815998642612/

VANCOUVER, FEB 10: 12:30 PST CBC Vancouver (700 Hamilton Street)
https://www.facebook.com/events/145891392744215/

VICTORIA, FEB 10: 11am in front of the BC provincial law courts. (850 Burdett Ave)
https://www.facebook.com/events/1585303884910267/

CALGARY, FEB 11: City Hall at 6pm https://www.facebook.com/events/143312106363874/

NIMKII AAZHIBIKOONG: prayer gathering

TORONTO: Nathan Phillips Square 1 PM Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen St. W.
https://www.facebook.com/events/2102118743162362/

KITCHENER-WATERLOO: FEB 11 10 AM – 12 PM, Victoria Park
https://www.facebook.com/events/399112210529622/

OPASKWAYAK CREE NATION FEB 10, noon, GLMCC parking lot at OCN sign. Wear Red! https://www.facebook.com/events/187089648714167/

PALM BEACH COUNTY FLORIDA: FEB 10 (Schoolhouse Children’s Museum & Learning Center 129 E Ocean Ave)
https://twitter.com/ womeninblackpbc/status/962161688236777472?s=09

WINNIPEG, FEB 10 2-5 Odena at the Forks
https://www.facebook.com/events/143467939662410/

 

SNOW SCREENING: #Asinabka screens #Inuit & #Sámi shorts 2nite in #Ottawa for “Unikkaaqtuarniq: Stories from the North”

UNIKKAAQTUARNIQ: Stories from the North – Inuit & Sámi films projected onto a screen made of snow!

Last year Ottawa based Asinabka Film & Media Arts Festival screened a program of shorts produced by Indigenous filmmakers at Landsdowne Park. The winter weather cooperated with enough snow to build a large screen upon which the films were projected. At last year’s opening, along with the films, hot drinks were served as well as performances by local Indigenous artists. This year Silla + Rise was the opening act for the first day, Thursday, February 1 and the programming theme is “Indigenous filmmaking from the Arctic.”

Tonight is the final night for the screenings! This initiative has been in partnership with the Embassy of Norway with programming that has included shorts from Sámi filmmakers. The Sámi are the Indigenous people from the territories that are now known as Norway, Sweden, Finland and parts of Russia.

This event is FREE and features family-friendly programming. Dress warm and come on out to enjoy the final evening.

WHEN: Sunday, February 4, 2018 @ 6-9 pm
WHERE: Lansdowne Park (Outside the Horticulture Building) 1525 Princess Patricia Way, Ottawa

“Unikkaaqtuarniq” means Storytelling in the Inuktitut language, and is an ancient form of magic, with the power to connect the past with the present, teach lessons, impart values, heal, to explain the world and connect us to the universe through language and mythology. The stories in this program come from the Inuit people of Canada and Sami of northern Scandinavia, Indigenous peoples who have thrived in the arctic regions of the world for thousands of years, sharing stories inside the Sami lavvu and Inuit tupiq, enduring the changing seasons of dark and light, of colonialism, of climate change. Although these cultures live thousands of kilometres away from each other, they share a common history of resilience in their language, culture and magic through storytelling.

More information is available on their FB Event Page.

Iđitsilba Trailer from Davás film on Vimeo.

PROGRAMMING: 

PROGRAM #1 (1 Hour)

We Are Still Here
Sofia Jannock • 5:14 • 2016 • Sweden
A powerful song and music video that is a statement about the continuing presence of the Sami people.

Just Give Me the Word
Sara Margrethe Oskal • 4:00 • 2017 • Norway • Sami
Sami artist Emma Elliane raps in her mother tongue about exploitations of the earth. Shot in Guovdageaidnu, a Sami community that has been fighting against multinational mining companies for years

Hila
Adam Bentley • 3:27 • 2016 • Canada
An Inuit woman becomes the first person to ever be featured in a choreographed snowshoe dance video.

Inuk Hunter
George Annanack • 2016 • 4:04 • Canada • Sign Language
A poetic and contemplative film about an Inuk man hunting for northern lights with his camera.

Kuujjuaq
Sammy Gadbois (Inuit) • 4:54 • 2016 • Canada • English
A video essay about the perspective of a teenager on his hometown.

Snow
Nivi Pederson • Greenland • 2017 • 7 Min.
Shovelling snow in the capital of Greenland is a big part of everyday winter life. Three Nuuk residents share their reflections – and frustrations – about this seemingly never-ending task. The Tao of Snow Shovelling!

Jurret On (Under Two Skies)
Anssi Komi, Suvi West • Sapmi – Finland • 2017 • 12 Min.
Pregnant with her first child, Helsinki-based director Suvi West shares her longing to return north to her ancestral lands to ensure her child has a northern Sámi identity. While her Finnish partner Anssi does not feel at home up north, his love for her makes him contemplate a change in lifestyle and a move to Sápmi. This personal documentary is a portrait of a couple at a crossroads in their lives and a testament to one’s deep love for their land.

Shaman
Echo Henoche • Canada • 2017 • 5 min
The story of a ferocious polar bear turned to stone by an Inuk shaman. Hand-drawn and painted by Henoche in a style all her own, Shaman shares with the world her perspective on this Labrador Inuit legend.

Three Thousand
Asinnajaq • Canada • 2017 • 14 Min.
Artist Asinnajaq throws a creative net into the National Film Board of Canada’s audiovisual archive, weaving historic footage of the Inuit into a stunningly original animation. In 14 minutes of luminescent cinema, she recasts the past, present and future of the Inuit in a surprising new light.

PROGRAM #2 (1 Hour)

Sámi Bojá
Elle Sofe Henriksen • 9 min • 2015 • Norway
Mikkel is a reindeer herder who has the entire responsibility for the herd of his family. He has a tough shell like a sámi boy should have. But in his inside there is chaos.

Burning Sun
Elle Márjá Eira • 12 min • 2015 • Norway
Májjen carries a very special hat. All the women in her tribe wear this hat. Its shape resembles a horn. The hat is of great value for her. But the men representing the church mean the hat has a likeness to the horn of the devil itself. So the hats must be extinguished

Edith & Aljosja
Ann Holmgren • 8 min • 2015 • Sweden
A woman and a man, a river keeps them separated. They have to break the laws of nature to come close to each other. A simple story about love that defies cultural differences.

Áile & Grandmother
Siljá Somby • 12 min • 2015 • Norway
Grandmother and Áile are close to one another and Grandmother teaches Áile the powers of Nature and healing, however Áile has a secret that puts their bond to the ultimate test, forcing Áile to open up, but can she save their relationship?

The Afflicted Animal
Egil Pedersen • 15 min • 2015 • Norway
A young girl seeks help for her afflicted dog, but other members in her family need more help. The mother is lost in her own mind, the father wants to cure his loneliness and the girl is searching for truth. The film takes place in a small Sámi home in a remote area in Northern Norway and portrays a dysfunctional relationship between father and daughter.

#URBANISMLAB #OTTAWA: #Canadian Identity, #Heritage & the Legacies of the Centennial in 1967

The National Capital Commission hosts talk on heritage conservation and nation building.

If you are in the Ottawa area a great regular event is the Capital Urbanism Lab Lecture Series offered by the National Capital Commission (NCC). The NCC is a Crown Corporation that manages federal lands, and “nationally significant public places” in and around Ottawa playing a role in heritage conservation in the National Capital Region. Their Urbanism Lab gathers to it experts in design, architecture, city building and heritage who rethink and reconsider our approaches to creating communities that work for everyone. Past speaker topics have included Indigenous Place Making and Youth Engagement in City Building. Upcoming lectures in 2018 will be focused on topics such as Canadian Design as a Cultural Export and The Capital and a Healthy 10-Minute Neighbourhood.  Past lectures are all archived on the NCC’s Youtube Channel.

Tonight’s lecture, Heritage, circa 1967, will focus on heritage projects that came into being during Canada’s Centennial year in 1967. That time was a moment of national building much like we see now with the Sesquicentennial and Canada 150. Reflection on nation building moments are critical for understanding how processes can compound the problems instead of inspiring new ways of sharing and co-existing in spaces that are often contested and problematic in how they position dominant culture at the expense of other members of a community. Come on out tonight and participate in conversations around creating better communities.

Heritage, circa 1967: The lessons and legacy of Canada’s centennial in the Capital and beyond

WHEN: Wednesday, October 11, 2017 @ 6:30 – 8:30 pm
WHERE: National Capital Commission, 202-40 Elgin Street, Ottawa, K1P 1C7

This is a free event. More information on the NCC’s website.

#OTTAWA CHAMBERFEST: #Indigenous #cellist Cris Derksen performs for #ChamberFringe

Cris Derksen Trio. Image provided by Ottawa CHAMBERFEST.

#ChamberFringe promotes performances that reach new audiences for Classical music.

Ottawa’s CHAMBERFEST has begun and as part of the #ChamberFringe programming Chamberfest is bringing Cree / Mennonite cellist Cris Derksen to the stage. The mandate of the The Ottawa Chamber Music Society (OCMS) is to “make classical music accessible to everyone.” Acts like the Cris Derksen Trio fit the bill perfectly with Cris “weaving her classical training together with electronics and her Aboriginal ancestry” and then combining the performance with “master hoop dancer Nimkii Osawamick and percussionist Jesse Baird.” (read more…)

Cris is also known for her collaborative work with other Indigenous artists like Buffy Sainte-Marie, Leanne Betasamosake Simpson, Tanya Tagaq and A Tribe Called Red. I have seen Cris perform on numerous occasions, most recently with Cree / Dene / Irish performer Iskwé. As a cellist, Cris’ compositions add rich depth and resonance to the music of all of the artists she works with. With the addition of Indigenous hoop dancer Nimkii Osawamick Tuesday’s performance promises to be a special night for CHAMBERFEST.

“Electrified and covered in flecks of gold, you exit gasping for air.” – Weird Canada

CRIS DERKSEN TRIO
Cris Derksen, cello, loops, electronics
Nimkii Osawamick, hoop dancer
Jesse Baird, percussion

WHEN: Tuesday, August 1 @ 10 pm
WHERE: La Nouvelle Scène Gilles Desjardins, 333 King Edward Avenue, Ottawa
HOW MUCH: $30 purchase tickets here

IMPORTANT NOTE: The ticket price for this show is $30 for a single ticket. For those under 35, there are $16 #TheBuzz tickets available, and a pass for any 3 days of Chamberfest starts at $59.

See full list of ChamberFest programming here.

Visit Cris Derksen’s website.

#CANADASCENE: Anishinabekwe @CanadasNAC #Ottawa gathers #Indigenous singers ShoShona Kish, Tanya Tagaq, Amanda Rheaume and more

ShoShona Kish. Image provided by the National Arts Centre.

Indigenous female artists perform at the National Arts Centre for Canada Scene.

This coming Saturday ShoShona Kish of the JUNO Award-winning band Digging Roots will be performing as part of an intimate evening with other Indigenous female artists. Also on the bill are Tanya Tagaq, Amanda Rheaume, Sandy Scofield, Iskwé, and Moe Clark.

From the NAC website:

ShoShona Kish, one half of the duo that fronts JUNO Award-winning band Digging Roots, has invited five of Canada’s most accomplished female Indigenous artists for Anishinabekwe, an unforgettable evening of music and musical storytelling, backed by musical powerhouse Digging Roots.

Polaris Prize-winner Tanya Tagaq is an Inuit throat singer and provocateur who creates music like almost nothing else in the world. From Ottawa, Canadian Folk Music Award winner and JUNO nominee Amanda Rheaume delivers her unique blend of folk-country-pop with a soulful ability to translate personal stories into song.

Sandy Scofield is a multiple award-winning Métis composer, musician, and singer from the Saulteaux and Cree Nations who hails from four generations of fiddlers, singers, and musicians. Singer-songwriter Iskwé draws on her Cree/Dene and Irish roots to produce a sound filled with booming bass lines and heavy beats, defining her distinctive offering of alternative RnB/TripHop. And Métis artist Moe Clark is a musical chameleon who creates sonic landscapes that pull from the soul, gospel, folk, and spoken word genres.

WHEN: Saturday, June 21 4:30 and 5:00 pm
WHERE: Babs Asper Theatre at the National Arts Centre, Ottawa

Click here to purchase tickets.

View the full Canada Scene line-up here.

Tanya Tagaq. Image provided by the National Arts Centre. 
Moe Clark. Image provided by the National Arts Centre.
Iskwé. Image provided by the National Arts Centre.

#CANADASCENE: Today @ 6 #TheJerryCans #FREE @CanadasNAC #Ottawa


The National Arts Centre’s Canada Scene features The Jerry Cans tonight!

There are only a few Scene@6 events left before Canada Scene wraps up at the National Arts Centre in Ottawa. Tonight check out The Jerry Cans for FREE at the NAC at 6 pm. This Iqaluit band is described as a “unique mix of Inuktitut alt-country, throat singing, and reggae combines to make them a distinctly northern, one-of-a-kind group.”

For more about this event and The Jerry Cans visit the NAC website.

#CANADASCENE: #SceneoRama – another #FREE event at the National Arts Centre #Ottawa

Ottawa’s National Art Centre has your Friday night planned out with Scene-o-Rama!

The NAC always does a fantastic job of transforming their lobby space into a pulsating event space with a club-like atmosphere. Whether it’s an impromptu round dance with A Tribe Called Red or ITK’s Taste of the Arctic they are experts at hosting parties that are unique and sexy! This weekend opens with another FREE Canada Scene event hosted in the NAC’s Canal Lobby. Along with art, performances and live music, drinks and Canadian tapas ($8 / piece or 4 for $30) will be available throughout the evening.

WHEN: Friday, July 14 @ 9 pm – 12 am
WHERE: National Arts Centre Ottawa in the Canal Lobby

From the National Arts Centre website

A baffling bunch of sheep, two plaid-wearing brothers, a full-size lighthouse, five loopy film installations, an eight-sided keyboard extravaganza, vocal gymnastics, an intimate touch, exquisite dancing, six-thousand light bulbs, movies created and destroyed, a bamboo forest, and more. Welcome to Scene-O-Rama!

Hosted by DJ Memetic and featuring performances and installations by:

Octomasher
Jesse Stewart
 with DJ MemeticDJ Emily Jones, and Vincent Bishop

15 X AT NIGHT
Fortier Danse-Création
Performer Naishi Wang

Les moutons
BoucharDanse

The Brothers Plaid 
Bill Coleman and Mark Shaub

Impromtu
Gabriel Dharmoo

CLOUD
Caitlind Brown
 and Wayne Garrett

Dance Machine
battery opera performance

Seances
Guy Maddin
Evan Johnson, and Galen Johnson

Windows Collective
Pixie Cram, Dave Johnson, Paul Gordon, Roger D.Wilson

ENTRE
Lilith & Cie/Aurélie Pedron

Range Light, Borden-Carleton, PEI
Kim Morgan

Presented in association with the Canada Dance Festival

For more information visit the Scene-o-Rama Facebook Event Page and the NAC’s website.

#CANADASCENE: #FREE #Music this week at the National Arts Centre #Ottawa

The National Art Centre Ottawa begins the week with Miguel De Armas’ Cuban grooves.

Last week’s Canada Scene line-up started with Buffy Sainte-Marie performing with special guests DJ Shub (formerly of A Tribe Called Red) and the legendary Randy Bachman. This performance not only opened the week but as a Canada Scene signature event closed the Canada 150 celebrations in the city of Ottawa. The performance was incredible and you could sense there were many Buffy (and Randy!) fans in the audience. The opening act – Leela Gilday– also wowed the crowd. Leela “weaves her experiences as a northerner, a member of the Dene nation, and a traveller into songs with a sense of humour and social justice, and an ironic appreciation of human folly.” If ever you have the opportunity to see Leela perform you will not be disappointed by her talent and power. (Read more…)

This week Canada Scene opens with Ottawa-based Havana-born musician Miguel De Armas. For the show tonight “Miguel brings his bright Latin beat to the festival’s Canada Stage series for a performance that is nothing short of a master class in original Cuban rhythms – airy, feel-good jazz that spreads itself comfortably in all directions and into all kinds of music.” The show, starting at 6 pm at the NAC, is FREE and part of the ongoing Scene@6 series running throughout Canada Scene in the NAC’s newly designed Atrium. The series “showcases this country’s top folk, roots, world, and jazz artists.” (read more…)

Upcoming FREE Scene@6 performances include William Prince, Karim Dabo, The Jerry Cans and Nick Sherman as well as many other amazing performers. For the full list click here.


WILLIAM PRINCE


KARIM DABO


THE JERRY CANS


NICK SHERMAN


LEELA GILDAY


DJ SHUB

#CANADA150 DO BETTER: #BarbaraKentner

REPOSTING FROM FACEBOOK (authour Dave Cryderman)

To Barb Kentner,

We’ve never met, but I want to say I am sorry. I’m sorry you had to go through life in a world so hostile to you that it killed you. I am sorry to your family and to your daughter as they live through that as well. I can only hope that death brings you some peace and refuge, and that we can move to see past your victimization to stories of how valuable, loved, and strong you were.

I have been struggling with wanting to say something to you and to the community at large. Something honest, if ugly, and when I heard of your passing the first words to come were an apology.

I wasn’t in that car, and it wasn’t me who threw that hitch, but Brayden Bushby is my responsibility. At one time or another growing up, every white man in this community has known, enabled, turned a blind eye to, or engaged in the sort of behaviour that had Brayden thinking what he was doing was ok. I think about that a lot – about the times I’ve seen, heard, watched and participated while small acts – cumulative acts – of erasure and dehumanization unfold.

The attack you endured and your death has brought so much emotion and energy to the surface in this town. It worries me to see it invested back into a system that never wanted you. A system that killed you. As someone who has benefitted from this “business as usual” system my whole life, I feel I need to be honest about the world that Brayden and I were made in and the nature of our abusive relationship to you:

The “justice system” was never meant to serve you or your family. It was designed to serve Brayden and I, and to criminalize you for the ways in which you survive, and cope. Yet we expect it to be different, to change, to reform.

The police were never designed to serve and protect you. They were designed to protect Brayden and I from you when you stand up and resist. Yet we expect them to be different, to change, to reform.

The federal government was never meant to care for you, or to intervene and provide oversight or solutions when justice isn’t done. They’ve been waging war, trying to kill you for 150 years so Brayden and I can live comfortably on your land. They’re my government, not yours, and despite the nice words and recognition they may put out, they will never need you the way they need me. You’ve only ever been in the way, a problem to be dealt with. In that world, where trailer hitches are a solution, we expect them to be different, to change, to reform.

Brayden and I have been in training since we were kids. Singing the national anthem every morning and building identities designed to overwrite your existence and see you as less than human, as savage, as disposable or as something from the past so that we can get our cut of the cash from exploiting your land.

I know you’ve lived this stuff your whole life, but I wonder if a white man has ever been honest with you and told you any of these things directly. I feel like I owe it to you, your family, and to the community, to take responsibility for being honest about our abusive relationship because it will not stop. We’ll keep on killing you and dehumanizing you because that is what we’re built to do. Every appeal to the system that made us to “do something” or “step in” will only serve to further legitimize what is inherently illegitimate, and strengthen the bond of our abusive relationship.

I’m sorry if that’s harsh, but it’s the truth. If we’re ever going to find ways to build healthy relationships as the community moves forward after your loss, we’ll need to start from there.

Rest in Peace Barb.